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Full text of "Transactions of the Massachusetts Horticultural Society"

HORTICULTURAL SOCIEiy 



1943 

YEAR BOOK 

OF THE 

MASSACHUSETTS HORTICULTURAL 

SOCIETY 



Foreword 



The Committee on Lectures and Publications has 
the honor to present herewith the twentieth number 
of the Society's Year Book, with which is combined 
the annual reports for the year 1942. 

Elmer D. Merrill, Chairman. 
Boston, Mass. 

May 3, 1943. 



W6 







Dr. George 0. Clark 

Elected a member of the Board of Trustees at the annual 
meeting, May 3, 1943. 



Table of Contents 

Foreword 1 

Officers for 1943 5 

Committees for 1943 6 

Medals and Certificates Awarded in 1942 7 

The Burrage Gold Cup Award 14 

Recipients of Special Medal Awards in 1942 15 

Garden Awards in 1942 19 

Deerskins for Binding Books 20 

Garden Clubs Not Members of the Massachusetts Federation 21 

Gifts to the Library 26 

Books Added to the Library 27 

Benevolent Fraternity Fruit and Flower Mission .... 38 

Necrology 39 

Annual Meeting, 1943 43 

The President's Address 43 

Report of the Secretary 46 

Report of the Treasurer 49 

Report of the Library Committee 51 

Report of the Committee on Exhibitions 52 

Report of the Committee on Prizes 56 

Report of the Committee on the Exhibitions of the Products 

of Children's Gardens 58 

Result of the Balloting 60 

Honorary Members 61 

Corresponding Members 61 



THE BOARD OF GOVERNMENT 

OF THE 

MASSACHUSETTS HORTICULTURAL 
SOCIETY 

President 
EDWIN S. WEBSTER 

Vice-Presidents 

William Ellery 
Charles K. Cummings 

Trustees 

*JoHN S. Ames Samuel J. Goddard (1944) 

Aubrey Butler (1945) Walter Hunnewell (1946) 

George W. Butterworth (1946) Harlan P. Kelsey (1945) 

WiNTHROP L. Carter (1946) Dunbar Lockwood (1945) 

George 0. Clark (1944) ^ Elmer D. Merrill (1944) 

Mrs. John Gardner Coolidge (1946) Harold S. Ross (1944) 

Mrs. S. V. R. Crosby (1946) Fletcher Steele (1945) 

* Charles K. Cummings Mrs. Roger S. Warner (1945) 
*WiLLiAM Ellery *Edwin S. Webster 

William P. Wolcott (1944) 

Honorary Trustees 
Professor Oakes Ames 
Miss Marian Roby Case 

Treasurer 
John S. Ames 

Assistant Treasurer 
Walter Hunnewell 

Secretary 
Edward I. Farrington 

* Members ex-officio. Dates given are those of expiration of terms. 



COMMITTEES OF THE SOCIETY 
For the Year Ending May 1, 1944 



Executive Committee 

EDWIN S. WEBSTER. Chairman 

JOHN S. AMES WILLIAM ELLERY 

CHARLES K. CUMMINGS WALTER HUNNEWELL 

Finance Committee 

EDWIN S. WEBSTER. Chairman 

JOHN S. AMES WALTER HUNNEWELL 

Budget Committee 

EDWIN S. WEBSTER, Chairman 

JOHN S. AMES WILLIAM ELLERY 

CHARLES K. CUMMINGS WALTER HUNNEWELTj 

Membership Committee 

GEORGE W. BUTTERWORTH. Chairman 

WINTHROP L. carter DUNBAR T^CKWOOD 

Committee on Exhibitions 

ELMER D. MERRILL, Chairman 

SAMUEL J. GODDARD ALLEN HIXON 

CHARLES P. GORELY. JR. MRS. IRVING C. WRIGHT 

Committee on Prizes 

AUBREY BUTLER, Chairman 

JOHN S. AMES GEORGE O. CLARK 

ERNEST BOROWSKI SYDNEY KIMPTON 

Committee on Library 

CHARLES K. CUMMINGS. Chairman 

MRS. 8. V. R. CROSBY^ MRS. ROGER S. WARNER 

Committee on Iiectures and Publications 

ELMER D. MERRILL. Chairman 

MISS MARIAN ROBY' CASE MRS. JOHN G. COOLIDGE 

Committee on Special Medals 

HAROLD S. ROSS. Chairman 

AUBREY BUTLER ELMER D. MERRILL 

HARLAN P. KELSEY WILLIAM P. WOTXJOTT 

Committee on Gardens 

GEORGE W. BUTTERWORTH. Chairman 

DR. GEORGE O. CLARK HAROLD S. ROSS 

DUNBAR LOCKWOOD FLETCHER STEELE 

Committee on Building 

WILLIAM ELLERY, Cliairman 
GEORGE W. BUTTERWORTH CHARLES K. CUMMINGS 

Committee on Children's Gardens Exhibitions 

SAMUEL J. GODDARD, Chairman 

DANIEL W. O'BRIEN MRS. HENRY D. TUDOR 

Committee on the Albert C. Burrage Grold Vase 

WALTER HUNNEWELL, Chairman 

ALBERT C. BURRAGE, JR. ELMER D. MERRILL 

AUBREY BUTLER WILLIAM P. WOLCOTT 

Nominating Committee 
AUBREY B. BUTLER DUNBAR LOCKWOOD 

HARLAN P. KELSEY FLETCHER STEELE 

MRS. ROGER WARNER 



Medals and Certificates Awarded 

in 1942 

The Albert C. Burr age Gold Vase 
Mr. and Mrs. M. M. Van Beuren, Newport, R. I., for a lily garden at the 
Spring Show. 

George Robert White Medal of Honor 
Jens Jensen, Ellison Bay, Wis., for eminent service in horticulture. 

Thomas Roland Medal 

Vincent R. DePetris, Grosse Pointe Farms, Mich., greenhouse grower and 

horticultural expert, who has developed new hardy chrysanthemums. 

Jackson Dawson Memorial Medal 
Henry T. Skinner, curator of the Morris Arboretum in Chestnut Hill, Pa. 

H. H. Hunnewell Medal 
Mrs. William A. Parker, for an estate at North Easton, Mass. 

President's Cup 

William T. Walke & Sons, Inc., for a southern garden at the Spring Show. 

t 

Gold Medal of the Massachusetts Horticultural Society 

Edward I. Farrington, Secretary of the Massachusetts Horticultural So- 
ciety and editor of Horticulture. "For long and distinguished service." 

Gold Medal of the Horticultural Society of New York 

William T. Walke & Sons, Inc., for a southern garden at the Spring Show. 

Gold Medal of the Pennsylvania Horticultural Society 
Edwin S. Webster, for a group of orchids at the Spring Show. 

Beacon Hill Garden Club Cup 
Cape Ann Garden Club, for a geranium garden at the Spring Show. 

Trophy of the Massachusetts Department of Agriculture 
Harlan P. Kelsey, Inc., for a Carolina mountain scene at the Spring Show. 

Sarah Todd Bulkley Bronze Medal of the Garden Club of America 
Mr. and Mrs. M. M. Van Beuren, for a lily garden at the Spring Show. 

Crystal Vases 
Breck's, for the tulip. Crusader, best bloom in the show. 
A. Frylink & Son, Inc., Babylon, L. I., N. Y., for the daffodil. Lord Well- 
ington, best bloom in the show. 

Book: "Plant Hunters in Andes" 
Mrs. J. D. Cameron Bradley, for the camellia Aileen, best bloom in the 
show. 

7 



8 MASSACHUSETTS HORTICULTURAL SOCIETY 

Large Gold Medals 

Berkshire Garden Center, Stockbridge, for its educational work and other 

activities. 
Albert C. Burrage, Jr., for research in vegetable selection and other work. 
Mrs. Charles E. Riley, for a valley garden and pools at Cotuit. 

Blue Ribbon Certificate 

Cit}^ of Quiney, for the maintenance of a traffic circle in a difficult situation 
at the Fore River Bridge. 

Gold Medals 

L. Sherman Adams, for a group of miltonias. 

American Orchid Society, for a gi'oup of orchids at the Spring Show. 

Dr. Thomas Barbour, for a vegetable display. 

Borst & Fraser, for a kitchen garden at the Spring Show. 

Breck's, for a feature display of squash. 

Breck's, for a display' of daffodils. 

Breck's, for a mid-Summer border at the Spring Show. 

W. N. Craig, for a table of rock garden and bulbous plants at the Spring 

Show. 
Mr. and Mrs. Francis B.*Crowninshield, for a gi'oup of chrysanthemums. 
Mr. and Mrs. Francis B. Crowninshield, for a formal gardem. 
Sherman W. Eddy, Avon, Conn., for a New England scene at the Spring 

Show. 
A. Frylink & Son, Inc., Babylon, L. I., N. Y., for a collection of daffodils. 
Garden-in-the-Woods, for a farmyard scene as of 1842. 
Garden-in-the- Woods, for a display of seed vessels, bemed shrubs, and 

fruiting branches. 
Alexander I. Heimlich, for a ledge garden at the Spring Show. 
Harlan P. Kelsey, Inc., for a Carolina mountain scene at the Spring Show. 
Massachusetts Garden Clubs' Exhibition Committee for the skillful design 

and execution of the garden club exhibits at the Spring Show. 
Mrs. Flagler Matthews, Rye, N. Y., for a display of daffodils. 
National Park Service, for its outstanding contribution to the success of 

the Spring Show. 
A. A. Pembroke, for snapdragon General Douglas MacArthur. 
Perry Seed Company, for a display of vegetables. 
A. N. Pierson, Inc., Cromwell, Conn., for a display of roses at the Spring 

Show. 
Seabrook Nurseries, Seabrook, N. H., for a display of gladiolus. 
United States Cut Flower Company, Elmira, N. Y., for a display of roses 

at the Spring Show. 
Mr. and Mrs. M. M. Van Beuren, for a lily garden at the Spring Show. 
Louis Vasseur, for a display of clematis. 

William T. Walke & Sons, Inc., for a southern garden at the Spring Show. 
Edwin S. Webster, for a group of orchids. 
Edwin S. Webster, for a group of chrysanthemums. 



MEDALS AND CERTIFICATES AWARDED IN 1942 9 

Edwin S. Webster, for a group of orchids at the Spring Show. 
Weston Nurseries, Inc., for an informal garden at the Spring Show. 

Silver Medals 

J. Herbert Alexander for a display of Iris kaempf eri. 

Arnold Arboretum, for a collection of flowering shrubs. 

Bay State Nurseries, Inc., for an informal garden at the Spring Show. 

Boston Mycological Club, for a mushroom exhibit. 

Mrs. E. D. Brandegee, for a group of chrysanthemums. 

Breck's, for a display of tulips. 

Breck's, for a display of butternut squash. 

Breck's, for general excellence of trade booth at the Spring Show. 

Breck's, for a Spring border at the Spring Show. 

Cherry Hill Nurseries, for an informal garden at the Spring Show. 

Dr. George 0. Clark, for a display of high bush blueberries. 

Copeland School, Brockton, for fine culture of zinnias. 

Corliss Brothers, Inc., for an informal garden at the Spring Show. 

W. N. Craig, for a display of tulips. 

W. N. Craig, for a display of lilies. 

Mrs. George R. Fearing, for a group of Helleborus niger. 

Mrs. Edward Forbes, for growing and arranging chrysanthemums. 

Gardeners' and Florists' Club of Boston, for a displaj^ of tulips. 

Gardner Museum, for a group of cyclamen at the Spring Show. 

Gardner Museum, for a formal garden at the Spring Show. 

George P. Gardner, Jr., for a display of camellias. 

Lohrman Seed Companj^, for general excellence of trade booth at the 

Spring Show. 
Meloripe Fruit Company, for general excellence of trade booth at the 

Spring Show. 
The Merrys, for a group of dajdily seedlings. 

Needham Floral Company for a white azalea garden at the Spring Show. 
R. T. Paine, 2nd, for a gi'oup of cymbidiums at the Spring Show. 
R. T. Paine, 2nd, for a C^'mbidium pauwelsii at the Spring Show. 
A. A. Pembroke, for a display of snapdragons at the Spring Show. 
Roses, Incorporated, Columbus, Ohio, for an educational rose exhibit at 

the Spring Show. 
Sandyloam (Alan and Esther Macneil), North Springfield, Vt., for a dis- 
play of lilies. 
R. H. Stearns Company, for general excellence of trade booth at the 

Spring Show. 
Mrs. Galen L. Stone, for a group of Acacia pubescens at the Spring Show. 
Mr. and Mrs. M. M. Van Beuren, for a display of miscellaneous flowers at 

the Spring Show. 
William T. Walke & Sons, Inc., for a group of chrysanthemums. 
Edwin S. Webster, for standard fuchsias. 
Mr. and Mrs. Edwin S. Webster, for an informal garden at the Spring 

Show. 



10 MASSACHUSETTS HORTICULTURAL SOCIETY 

Bronze Medals 

American Begonia Society, for an educational exhibit of begonias at the 

Spring Show. 
Arnold Arboretum, for a display of plants from China. 
Camp Zakelo, for a model of campus and forest at the Spring Show. 
Dr. George 0. Clark, for a display of clematis. 
Cummings, the Florist, for a collection of new chrysanthemums. 
Future Farmers of America, for a backyard garden at the Spring Show. 
Mrs. Randolph C. Grew, for a meadow garden at the Spring Show. 
Thomas J. Grey Company, for general excellence of trade booth at the 

Spring Show. 
Kenneth Houghton, for a display of Shasta daisies. 
Alexander Irving Heimlich, for a display of snapdragons at the Spring 

Show. 
Charles R. Higbee, for an exhibit of soybeans. 

Jamaica Plain High School, for a backyard garden at the Spring Show. 
Harlan P. Kelsey, Inc., for general excellence of trade booth at the Spring 

Show. 
The Merrys, for a display of daffodils. 
The Merrys, for a display of tulips. 
New England Rose Society, for a display of roses. 
North High School, Agricultural Department, for a backyard garden at 

the Spring Show. 
Perry Seed Company, for general excellence of trade booth at the Spring 

Show. 
Mrs. Louis E. Phaneuf, for arrangements of dried and living material at 

the Spring Show. 
John D. Runkle School, for a model of an early American house and gar- 
den at the Spring Show. 
Harold A. Ryan. Inc., for a display of Eucharis amazonica. 
Dr. George C. and Mr. Henry Lee Shattuck for camellia arrangements. 
Shreve, Crump & Low Company for general excellence of trade booth at 

the Spring Show. 
Spanish Art Ornamental Iron Works, Inc., for general excellence of trade 

booth at the Spring Show. 
Wendell W. Wyman, for a vase of Gladiolus White Gold. 
Wilfrid "Wheeler, for holly (Ilex Opaca) selections. 
Women's Municipal League, for an exhibit of canned goods. 

First Class Certificates 

Cymbidium Jane Pierson, var. Wallie, exhibited by Wallace R. Pierson, Jr. 
Seneca Grape, exhibited by the New York State Agricultural Experiment 
Station. 



medaijS and certificates awarded in 1942 11 

Awards of Merit 

Azalea Laura Nash, exhibited by Ernest Borowski. 

Kendall Apple, exhibited by New York State Agricultural Experiment 

Station. 
Macoun Apple, exhibited by New York State Agricultural Experiment 

Station. 
Milton Apple, exhibited by New York State Agricultural Experiment 

Station. 
Blueberry Dixie, exhibited by Dr. George 0. Clark. 
Brassocattleya Surya, exhibited by L. Sherman Adams. 
Cattleya Fred Sander, exhibited by Edwin S. Webster. 
Chrysanthemum Arno Nehrling, exhibited by Cummings the Florist. 
Chrysanthemum Governor Dewey, exhibited by Cummings the Florist. 
Chrysanthemum Laura Nash, exhibited by Cummings the Florist. 
Chrysanthemum Mary Gold, exhibited by Cummings the Florist. 
Seedling chrysanthemum Granite State, exhibited by the University of 

New Hampshire. 
Cymbidium Anna Randall var. Harry, exhibited by Wallace R. Pierson, 

Jr. 
Cymbidium Erica Sander var. Buttercup, exhibited by L, Sherman Adams. 
Cypripedium Lucile Williams, exhibited by L. Sherman Adams. 
Cypripedium Madge Le Gros, exhibited by L. Sherman Adams. 
Cypripedium Radnage, exhibited by L. Sherman Adams. 
Daffodil General Douglas MacArthur, exhibited by A. Frylink & Son, Inc. 
Dahlia Dahliatown Orchid, exhibited by J. Herbert Alexander. 
Gladiolus Phedra, exhibited by L. P. Benedict. 
Hemerocallis Shangri La, exhibited by The Merry s. 
Laeliocattleya Blendia var. Surfside, exhibited by L. Sherman Adams. 
Laeliocattleya Helen Wilmer var. Perfecta, exhibited by L. Sherman 

Adams. 
Laeliocattleya Invicta, exhibited by Edwin S. Webster. 
Lilium Browni Kiunkiang seedling, exhibited by Sandyloam (Alan and 

Esther Macneil). 
Paeonia mlokosewitsehii, exhibited by Louis Vasseur. 
Seedling Peach Compton, exhibited by Mrs. Winifred Compton. 
Seedling Peony Anton Bulk, exhibited by Reinier Bulk. 
Rose Victory Red, exhibited by W. H. Elliott & Sons Co. 
Snapdragon Arno H. Nehrling, exhibited by C. H. Lothrop. 
Snapdragon General Douglas MacArthur, exhibited by A. A. Pembroke. 
Snapdragon Harlequin, exhibited by A. A. Pembroke. 
Snapdragon Sunshine, exhibited by A. A. Pembroke. 
Snapdragon Victory, exhibited by A. A. Pembroke. 
Butternut Squash, exhibited by Breck's. 
Streptocarpus Weston's hybrids, exhibited by Mrs. E. D. Brandegee. 

Votes of Commendation 
Rose Pink Carnation-Rose Caress, exhibited by Sim Carnation Co. 



12 MASSACHUSETTS HORTICULTURAL SOCIETY 

Carnation Dark Pink Hermosa, exhibited by Samuel J. Goddard. 

Dahlia Anna Aldrich, exhibited by Fred W. Pettit. 

Epiphyllum (Phylloeaetus) Bataan's Defenders, exhibited by Louis 

Vasseur. 
Epiphyllum (Phylloeaetus) Jonathan M. Wainwright, exhibited by Louis 

Vasseur. 
Iris k»mpf eri seedlings, exhibited by Louis Vasseur. 
Lilium wardi, exhibited by Sandyloam (Alan and Esther Macneil). 
Vase of Lilium, willmottise type, exhibited by Louis Vasseur. 
Vase of Regal lilies, exhibited by Samuel J. Goddard. 
Lilium seneca, exhibited by Sandyloam (Alan and Esther Macneil ) . 
Snapdragon Dawn, exhibited by A. A. Pembroke. 

Cultural Certificates 

L. Sherman Adams, for vanda Miss Joaquim (Hookeriana x teres). 

Peter Arnott, for Dendrobium nobile virginale. 

Peter Arnott, for a gi'oup of chrj'santhemums. 

Peter Arnott, for Laelioeattleya hyperion. 

Ernest Borowski, for Rhododendron Lady Alice Fitzwilliam fragrantissi- 

mum. 
Ernest Borowski, for hybrid rhododendron (Dexter seedling) . 
G. S. Bradley, for Coelogyne cristata. 
George W. Butterworth, for Phalaenopsis schilleriana. 
Louis Campagnolo, for a vegetable display. 
Mrs. George R. Fearing, for a gi*oup of Helleborus niger. 
James J. Hurley, for Cymbidium insigne var. sanderi. 
James J. Eurley, for Cymbidium sandersoni erica. 
James J. Hurley, for Cymbidium pauwelsii. 
Frank Walke, for Coelogyne cristata. 
Wendell W. Wj'man, for a vase of Gladiolus White Gold. 

Vote of Thanks 

L. Sherman Adams, for orchids at the Spring Show. 
Dr. Thomas Barbour, for string beans ( the Prince). 
Mrs. James S. Bassett, for corsages of winter materials. 
Harold T. Bent, for a vase of hemerocallis and Thalictrum polygamum. 
Harold T, Bent, for a vase of Lilium canadense and Thalictrum polyga- 
mum. 
Ernest Borowski, for an exhibit of Rhododendron discolor. 
Ernest Borowski, for an exhibit of Azalea macrantha. 
Boston Aquarium Society, for aquaria at the Spring Show. 
Bussey Institution, for an exhibit of hybrid sweet corn and radishes. 
Bussey Institution, for an exhibit of sugar cane. 
George W. Butterworth, for a display of orchids at the Spring Show. 
Cambridge Plant Club, for Christmas swag. 
Cambridge Plant Club, for magnolia wreath. 



MEDALS AND CERTIFICATES AWARDED IN 1942 13 

James Cass, for a vase of lilies. 

Mrs. Chester Cook, for an exhibit showing how to make a wreath and dis- 
playing finished wreaths. 

William N. Craig, for a display of Pyracantha coccinea lalandi. 

William N. Craig, for a collection of tulips. 

C. K. Cummings, for semi-double pink camellia. 

Ernest B. Dane for a display of orchids at the Spring Show. 

Alice N. Davis, for potted sage. 

Clem H. Ferguson, for a display of orchids at the Spring Show. 

Florists Telegraph Delivery Association, Eastern Massachusetts Unit, for 
exhibits of carnations at the Spring Show. 

Flowerfield, for an exhibit of Iris kaempf eri varieties. 

Bowman Graton, for a display of orchids at the Spring Show. 

Mrs. Charles H. Haddrell, for tradescantia plants. 

Mrs. Charles H. Haddrell, for a collection of hardy evergreen barberry. 

Charles Hibbard, for a display of orchids at the Spring Show. 

Richard C. Hoffman, for a display of orchids at the Spring Show. 

Chandler Hovey, for a display of orchids at the Spring Show. 

Walter Hunnewell, for a display of orchids at the Spring Show. 

Lewis Lipp, for Primula sinensis at the Spring Show. 

Massachusetts Department of Conservation, for mounted specimens of 
gypsy and brown-tail moths at the Spring Show. 

Mrs. Ralph S. Megathlin for Christmas roses. 

John W. Minns, for Epiphyllum (Phyllocactus) ackermanni. 

William M. Murphy, for a display of orchids at the Spring Show. 

William M. Murphy, for Wardian case with orchids at the Spring Show. 

John Mutch, for a display of orchids at the Spring Show. 

Neuro Psychiatric Wards, Fort Devens, for indoor gardens. 

Albert E. Peck, for a vase of Iris ksempferi. 

Wallace R. Pierson, Jr., for orchids at the Spring Show. 

A. Richards, for long purple egg plant. 

Richard Roland, for a display of orchids at the Spring Show. 

John L. Russell, for baby gladiolus Orangeade. 

Dr. George C. and Mr. Henry Lee Shattuck, for four different camellia 
blooms grown on the same plant. 

Symphony Flower Shop, for tulips and other flowers. 

Mrs. Arthur P. Teele, for dried arrangements. 

Dr. Frederic Tudor, for a display of orchids at the Spring Show. 

Miss Virginia Turner, for cherry tomatoes. 

University of New Hampshire, for a seedling pink pot chrysanthemum. 

University of New Hampshire, for seedling bronze disbudded pompon 
chrysanthemum. 

Louis Vasseur, for Sorbaria assurgens. 

Frank Walke, for Coelogyne cristata. 

Edwin S. Webster, for a display of orchids at the Spring Show. 

Dr. Louis 0. Williams, for a display of orchids at the Spring Show. 

H. 0. Woodward, for Christmas decorations and colored grasses. 



14 MASSACHUSETTS HORTICULTURAL SOCIETY 

Certificates for Children's Gardens 

Leon Beverly, Williamstown 

Noel Brown, Feeding Hills 

Nancy Burrows, South wick 

Albert Courtemanche, Brockton 

Ann Dacyczyn, South Deerfield 

Constance Damon, North Raynham 

Rose and Mary Dexter, Stow 

Walter Duncan, Jr., Wollaston 

Leo J. Fitzpatrick, Jr., Brockton 

Priscilla Knight, North Weymouth 

Robert J. Lavoie, Hopkinton 

Orrin Mcintosh, Haverhill 

Joseph Medeiros, Taunton 

Robert Murdock, Hubbardston 

Geraldine Ramsdell, Brockton 

Charlotte and Francis Riani, Marlboro 

Richard Rorstrom, Framingham Center 

Ernest Seymore, Jr., Ballardvale 

James and Robert Smith, Stoneham 

Jeannette Stillitano, Brockton 

Ida Stimson, Phillipston 

Evelyn and Eleanor Tatro, North Adams 

Donald Vetterling Greenfield 



The Burrage Gold Cup Award 

The award, of the Albert C. Burrage gold cup for 1942 was made 
to Mr. and IMrs. M. M. Van Beuren of Newport, R. I. (Joseph 
Winsock, gardener), for the lily garden set up by them at the 
Spring exhibition in Mechanics Building. This award was made 
by the Board of Trustees on recommendation of the Albert C. 
Burrage Gold Cup Committee as provided for under the deed of 
gift. 



Recipients of the Medals Awarded 

on Recommendation of the 

Special Medals Committee 

Jens Jensen 
Mr. Jens Jensen of Ellison Bay, Wis., who was awarded the 
George Robert White Medal of Honor for 1942, is dean of Ameri- 
can landscape architects. He has done a great amount of notable 




Mr. Jens Jensen 
Awarded the George Eobert White Medal of Honor in 1942. 

15 



16 



MASSACHUSETTS HORTICULTUEAL SOCIETY 




Mr. Vincent R. DePetris 

Grosse Point e Farms, Mich. 

Awarded the 

Thomas Boland Medal 



Mr. Henry T. Skinner 
Chestnut Hill, Pa. 
Awarded the 
Jackson Dawson Memorial Medal 




RECIPIENTS OP SPECIAL MEDALS 



17 



Mr. Albert C. Burrage 

of Ipswich 

Awarded the 

Society's Gold Medal 





Mr. Edward I. Farrixgton 

Secretary 

Awarded the 

Society's Gold Medal 



18 MASSACHUSETTS HORTICULTURAL SOCIETY 

work throughout the country, but his name is linked particularly 
closely with the great West Park System of Chicago, which he 
was instrumental in developing. He was one of the founders of 
the forest preserves which half encircle Chicago and himself 
founded "Friends of Our Native Landscape." Many parks and 
estates in various cities throughout the United States have been 
planned by Mr. Jensen, including a large number along Chicago's 
famous North Shore. The many important organizations of which 
he is a member include the Illinois Academy of Sciences, the Chi- 
cago Academy of Sciences and the American Geographic Society. 
The University of Wisconsin conferred the honorary degree of 
LL.D. upon him several j^ears ago. Although now a resident of 
Wisconsin, he lived for many years in Highland Park, 111., and last 
year a rose garden was presented to the city by the Men's Garden 
Club to commemorate the achievements of Mr. Jensen and other 
men who had helped to develop the city. The White Medal is given 
for eminent service in the interest of horticulture. 

Vincent R. de Petris 

Mr. Vincent R. dePetris of Grosse Farms, Mich., who was 
awarded the Thomas Roland Medal for 1942, has long been a 
prominent florist, but of late years has won new laurels by his 
work in developing improved hardy chrysanthemums. He is a 
trustee of the Michigan Horticultural Society, a director of the 
Detroit Garden Center, the National Gardeners' Association and 
the American Chrysanthemum Society. He has been very active 
in war-time activities. The Thomas Roland Medal is awarded for 
skill in horticulture and the award to Mr. de Petris seems especially 
appropriate, inasmuch as Mr. Roland was a greenhouse operator 
and florist. 

Henry T. Skinner 

The Jackson Dawson Memorial Medal for 1942 was awarded to 
Henry T. Skinner, curator of the Morris Arboretum at Chestnut 
Hill, Pa. Mr. Skinner is a very young man to attain this honor, 
but is widely recognized for his work as a plant propagator. His 
elementary training was at Wisley Gardens in England. Later, 
he was employed at the Arnold Arboretum, Jamaica Plain, Mass., 
and afterwards went to Cornell University. Then he was chosen 
for the Morris Arboretum position. Mr. Skinner's chief accom- 
plishments deal with original work in vegetative plant propaga- 
tion. This medal is given for work with woody plants and was 
struck in honor of a former superintendent of the Arnold Arbo- 
retum. 



Garden Awards in 1942 

The following awards were made by the Board of Trustees in 
1942 on recommendation of the Committee on Gardens: 

The Hunnewell gold medal to Mrs. William A. Parker for her 
estate at North Easton. This place is described as having old 
world appearance and charm while up to the minute in details of 
planting and human comfort. It is a medium small place inten- 
sively developed, combining flowers and a home vegetable garden 
such as would seem to be an ideal pattern for this period. The 
maintenance is excellent. 

The Society's gold medal to Mrs. Charles E. Riley in Cotuit 
''for the perfect maintenance of horticultural objects." This is an 
old garden in which planting done many years ago has been pre- 




A section of the garden of Mrs. Charles E. Riley, who was 
awarded a gold medal in 1942. 



served in remarkably good condition. A valley garden and pool 
were described by the committee as having real Victorian charm. 
The Society's gold medal to the Berkshire Garden Center in 
Stockbridge for the excellent educational exhibit which it main- 
tains, for its co-operation with the gardening public, for its ex- 
ample in stimulating the trial and use of new materials in the 

19 



20 



MASSACHUSETTS HORTICULTURAL SOCIETY 




The valley garden and pools on the Biley estate. 

p:arden and for its understanding utilization of a difficult natural 
terrain. 

The Society's gold medal to Mr. Albert C. Burrage, Jr., for his 
research in vegetable selection, for the preparation and use of 
much valuable data as applied to home gardens and for his very 
successful vegetable garden in Ipswich, where a plan for succes- 
sion crops has been developed extremely well. 

The Society's blue ribbon certificate to the City of Quincy for 
its excellent maintenance in a difficult situation of a traffic circle 
in the heart of an industrial center at the Quincy end of the Fore 
River bridge. 



Deerskins for Binding Books 

Grateful acknowledgement is made to Mr. Edwin S. Webster 
for the gift of carefully tanned deerskins, one or more of which 
have been presented to the library for use in binding books since 
1940. These skins are highly valued for covering some of the 
Society's most important books. 



Garden Clubs Not Members of the 
Massachusetts Federation 

Acton Garden Club. 

President, Mrs. Robert J. Bond, 2 Newton Rd., Acton. 
Secretary, Mrs. Raymond Hatch, Main St., Acton. 

Attleboro Garden Club. 

President, Mr. William Rohman, 28 West St., Attleboro. 
Secretary, Mrs. Arthur V. Gustafson, 173 Pike Ave., Attleboro. 

Bernardston Garden Club. 

President, Mrs. Margaret Bunnell, South St., Bernardston. 
Secretary, Mrs. Georgianna Herri ck, Northfield Rd., Bernardston. 

Beverly Improvement Society. 

President, Mrs. Frank E. Merriam, 73 Dane St., Beverly. 
Secretary, Miss Carrie C. Edgett, 8 Corning St., Beverly. 

Bridgewater Garden Club. 

President, Mrs. Vernon H. Pierce, 197 Park Ave., Bridgewater. 
Secretary, Mrs. Donald Atwood, 81 Grove St., Bridgewater. 

Brockton Garden Club. 

President, Mrs. Frank T. White, 22 Rockland St., Brockton. 
Secretary, Mrs. Ernest L. Hayes, 24 Marian Ave., Brockton. 

Chartley Garden Club. 

President, Mrs. Howard Crowe, North Worcester St., Attleboro. 
Secretary, Mrs. Millard Ashley, 8 Sturdy St., Attleboro. 

Clinton Women's Club, Department of Gardens of the. 
President, Mrs. Henry W. Pickford, 135 Walnut St., Clinton. 
Secretary, Mrs. Harold Toole, 51 Hammond St., Clinton. 

Cohasset, Amateur Gardeners of. 

President, Mrs. Burt Bristol, Summer St., Cohasset. 

Secretary, Mrs. William R. May, Cedar Lane, Cohasset. 
Easton, Garden Club of. 

President, Mr. Gustave Rydholm, 21 Holmes St., North Easton. 

Secretary, Mrs. Thomas Canan, North Easton. 
Franklin Garden Club. 

President, Mrs. Harry J. Geb, 28 High St., Franklin. 

Secretary, Mrs. Mary L. Bly, 95 Park Rd., Franklin. 
Groton Garden Club. 

Executive Committee, Mrs. Carlton A. Shaw, Mrs. Carl Lawrence, 
Groton. 

Secretary, Miss Elizabeth G. Pattee, Groton. 
Hampden Garden Club. 

President, Mr. James Morgan, Mountain Rd., Hampden. 

Secretary, Miss Ernestine 0. Bliss, Box 128, Hampden. 

21 



22 MASSACHUSETTS HORTICULTURAL SOCIETY 

Hanover Garden Club. 

President, Miss Fanny H. Phillips, South Hanover. 
Secretary, Miss Margaret Crowell, Norwell. 

Haverhill, Garden Department of Women's City Club. 

President, Mrs. HaiTy M. Femald, 22 South Merrill St., Bradford. 
Secretary, Mrs. S. Henry Klotzle, 84 Haseltine St., Bradford. 

HoLDEN Garden Club. 

President, Mrs. A. Kirke Warren, Main St., Holden. 
Secretary, Mrs. Leon G. Smith, Main St., Holden. 

HoLUSTON Garden Club. 

President, Mrs. Roy T. Wells, Washington St., Holliston. 
Secretary, Mrs. William B. Allen, Marshall St., Holliston. 

Hopedale Women's Club, Garden Department of. 

President, Mrs. Roy Hayward, 7 Union St., Hopedale. 
Secretary, Mrs. Alfred French, Jr., Union St., Hopedale. 

HoPKiNTON Garden Club. 
President, Miss Nellie J. Kirby, Waleott St., Hopkinton, 
Secretary, Mrs. Florence L. Guyton, 12 Claflin Ave., Hopkinton. 

HuBBARDSTON Continuation Club. 

Secretary, Mrs. Silas Wheeler, Hubbardston. 

Marblehead Women's Club, Conservation and Garden Group of. 
President, Mrs. Winfield W. Lunt, 52 Lee St., Marblehead. 
Secretary, Mrs. Robert Moore, 43 Birch St., Marblehead. 

Marlboro Garden Club. 

President, Mrs. Joseph L. Benson, 74 Newton St., Marlboro. 
Secretary, Miss Alice L. Hart, 125 Newton St., Marlboro. 

Marthas Vineyard Garden Club. 

President, Mrs. Wilfrid 0. White, 96 Mt. Vernon St., Boston. 
Secretary, Mrs. J. Coles Hegeman, 138 Congdon St., Providence, R. I. 

Medford Hillside, Garden Group of the Mothers' Club of. 
President, Mrs. V. R. HaiTis, 9 Woodland Ave., Medford. 
Secretary, Mrs. W. T. Larkin, 16 Dearborn St., Medford. 

Middleborough Garden Club. 

Secretary, Miss Lenda Tracy Hanks, 115 North St., Middleboro. 

Monson Garden Club. 

President, Mrs. Henry C. Sanderson, Wilbraham Rd., Monson. 
Secretary, Mrs. Belle Morris, Palmer Rd., Monson. 

Needham, Men's Garden Club of. 

President, Mr. Arthur W. Rohn, 61 Kingsbury St., Needham. 
Secretary, Mr. Almon G. Coburn, 36 Greendale Ave., Needham Heights. 

Newton Lower Falls, Village Garden of. 
President, Mrs. Karl Lange, 66 St. Mary's St., Newton Lower Falls. 
Secretary, Mrs. F. Deane Roberts, 28 Grayson Lane, Newton Lower 
Falls. 



GARDEN CLUBS NOT MEMBERS OF MASSACHUSETTS FEDERATION 23 

Newton Upper Falls Garden Club. 

President, Mrs. Austin W. Flint, 25 Washington Park, Newtonville. 

Secretary, Mrs. Harold T. Sprague, 24 Indiana Terrace, Newton Upper 
Falls. 
Northampton Women's Club, Garden Department of. 

President, Mrs. William B. McCourtie, 72 Dryads Green, Northampton. 

Secretary, Miss Caroline Chaffin, 69 High St., Northampton. 

North Attleboro Garden Club. 

President, Mrs. Charles Anthony, 4 Oxford St., Taunton. 

Secretary, Miss Josephine Thompson, 47 Ash St., N. Attleboro. 
Pembroke-Hanson Garden Club. . 

President, Mrs. William Walkey, Hanson. 

Secretary, Mrs. Garland Brooks, Hanson. 
Pepperell Garden Club. 

President, Miss Bertha Colson, R. F. D., East Pepperell. 

Secretary, Mrs. Franklin C. Wiley, Box 113, Pepperell. 
Rehoboth Garden Club. 

President, Mrs. Elliot F. Parker, Bay State Rd., Rehoboth. 

Secretary, Mrs. Almanza H. Kilroy, Summer St., Rehoboth. 
Rochester Garden Club. 

President, Mrs. Henry Olanssen, Rochester. 

Secretary, Mrs. Chester H. Cowen, Rochester. 
Shelburne Falls Garden Club. 

President, Mr. Charles L. Severance, 16 Maple St., Shelburne Falls. 

Secretary, Mrs. Fred M. Schontag, 51 Prospect St., Shelburne Falls. 
SOHANNO Garden Club. 

President, Mrs. George L. Dodd, Lake Archer, Wrentham. 

Secretary, Mrs. Harry W. Metcalf, 97 Franklin St., Wrentham. 
Southborough Women's Club, Garden Group of. 

President, Mrs. Ernest H. Carl, Southborough. 

Secretary, Mrs. Chester M. Bean, Box 52, Cordaville. 
Southbridge Garden Club. 

President, Mrs. Frank A. Morey, 32 Maple St., Southbridge. 
South Warren Community Garden Club. 

President, Mrs. Kenneth Tuttle, R. F. D. 1, West Brookfield. 

Secretary, Mrs. D. Walker Cheney, R. F. D., Brimfield. 
Spencer Garden Club. 

President, Mrs. Nan Wilson, 14 Ash St., Spencer. 

Secretary, Miss Margaret M. Kane, North Spencer Rd., Spencer. 
Stoneham Garden Club. 

President, Mrs. John P. English, 37 Maple St., Stoneham. 

Secretary, Miss Laura Lee, 220 William St., Stoneham. 
Sunderland Women's Club, Garden Section of. 

President, Mrs. Frank Darling, Sunderland. 

Secretary, Mrs. Robert Vesper, Sunderland. 



24 MASSACHUSETTS HORTICULTURAL SOCIETY 

Swansea, Country Garden Club of. 

President, Mrs. Ralph Loper, Sea View Ave., Touisset. 

Secretary, Mrs. Chester D. Borden, 21 Highland PI., Fall River. 
Tewksbury Garden Club. 

President, Mrs. George A. Ward, Maple St., Tewksbur3^ 

Secretary, iMrs. Williaim H. Dewing, James St., Tewksbury. 

Ware Social Science Club. 

President, Mrs. James G. McXett, 12 Elm St., Ware. 

Secretary, Miss Annie L. Breckenridge, 45 Bank St., Ware. 
Westborough Garden Club. 

President, Mrs. Ruby W. Stone, 9 Ruggles St., Westborough. 

Secretary, Miss Dorothy M. Weeks, Oak St., Westborough. 

West Bridge water Garden Club. 

President, Miss Elisabeth Hampe, South St., West Bridgewater. 
Secretary, Mrs. Kenneth F. Albee, 156 Bryant St., West Bridgewater. 

West Dennis Garden Club. 

President, Miss Marguerite Sheridan, Box 137, West Dennis. 
Secretary, Mrs. William H. Heptonstall, Box 6, West Dennis. 

West Newbury Garden Club. 

Secretary, Mrs. Parker H. Nason, 347 Main St., West Newbury. 

Weston Garden Club. 

President, Mrs. B. Loring Young, Jr., South Ave., Weston. 

Secretary, Mrs. Walter Weld, Ash St., Weston. 
Whitinsville Women's Club Garden Group. 

President, Mrs. Edmund Taft, Hill St., Whitinsville. 

Secretary, Mrs. Edward A. Ballard, Main St., Linwood, Mass. 
Whitman, Women's Garden Club of. 

President, Mrs. Albert Washburn, 40 Stetson St., Whitman. 

Secretary, Mrs. Edith M. Hatchfield, Washington St., Whitman. 
Whitman Men's Garden Club. 

President, Mr. William Churchill, 17 Burton Ave., Whitman. 

Secretary, Mr. Gilbert Emery, 58 Vernon St., Whitman. 
WiLBRAHAM Womcu's Club, Garden Group of. 

Leader, Mrs. Harry L. Piper, Glendale Rd., North Wilbraham. 

WiNCHENDON Garden Club. 

President, Mrs. Mark D. Shedd, 87 Pleasant St., Winchendon. 

Secretary, Mrs. WiUiam N. Crane, 41 Juniper St., Winchendon. 
Winthrop Hebrew Ladies Auxiliary Garden Club. 

President, Mrs. Martha Myerson, 91 Sewall Ave., Winthrop. 

Secretary, Mrs. Salley Maren, 9 Cliff Ave., Winthrop. 



Gifts to the Library 

The Massachusetts Horticultural Society acknowledges with 
thanks gifts to the Library from the following donors : 

Allen, Francis H. 

Collection of photographs of flowers. 
Allen, Herbert. 

Five dollars for the purchase of books. 

Baxter, Samuel M. 

Wholesale catalogue of the Syracuse Nurseries, autumn 1853 and 
spring 1854. 

Crosby, Mrs. S. V. R. 

American planning and civic annual. 1941. 

Harvard Forest, Petersham, Mass. 

The Harvard Forest models, a descriptive account. 

Garden Club Federation of Massachusetts. 

Banckes's Herbal : An herbal [1525] ed. and transcribed with intro- 
duction by S. V. Larkey and T. Pyles. 

The Herb Society of America. (Norton Memorial) . 

The English house-wife, now the 7th time much augmented, by Ger- 
vaseMarkham (G.M.) 1660. Facsimile of Book 2 chapter 1. 1942. 

Holzer, H. U. 

Key to New England trees, by J. F. Collins and H. W. Preston. 1909. 
Wredow's Gartenfreund, 12te aufl. 1869. 

Lambert, Arece. 

Practical and scientific mushroom culture; 2d ed. by L. F. Lambert. 
1941. 
Massachusetts Department of Labor and Industries. 

Agriculture, 16th census, 1940, vol. 1 parts 2-6, vol. 2 parts 2/9. 

Massachusetts Society for Promoting Agriculture. 

History of the Society 1892-1942, by A. E. Benson. 1942. 
An outline of the history of the Society. 1942. 

Pennsylvania Horticultural Society. 

Issues of Gardening Illustrated, Feb. 1, 1941-Oct. 1942. 

Rensselaer, M. van. 

Ceanothus, by Maunsell van Rensselaer and H. E. McMinn. 1942. 

RuGG, Harold G. 

Collection of nursery trade catalogues. 
Thibodeau, John. 

My Garden, 1939-1940. 

Warren, Mrs. Fisk. 

Collection of color plates of orchids. 

26 



BOOKS ADDED TO THE LIBRARY 



A List of Accessions 
Made Between May 1, 1941, and May 1, 1943 



This list is so arranged as to serve 
as a supplement to the catalogue. 
Members are urged to make use of it. 



Library Accessions 

HORTICULTURE 

General 

Bates, A. The gardener's third year, trees, vines and shrubs. 1941. 

Better Homes and Gardens. Gardening guide, ed. by W. Adams and 
F. B. Woodroffe. 1943. 

. Same; southern edition; ed. by A. C. Hottes. 1940. 

. Same; west coast edition; ed. by A. C. Hottes. 1940. 

. See how to plant your grounds; ed. by A. C. Hottes. 1941. 

Biles, R. E. The modern family garden book. 1941. 
Cross, R. Wake up and garden ! the complete month-by-month garden- 
er's manual. 1942. 
Gardening with the experts. 1941. 
Hottes, A. C. 1001 garden questions answered ; ed. 3. 1941. 

Laurie, A. and Ries, V. H. Floriculture, fundamentals and practices. 
1942. 

Massey, W. F. Massey's garden book for the southern states; rev. bv 

L. A. Niven. 1941. 
O'Brien, H. R. Better gardening : what, when and how to plant ; new 

and enl. ed. 1939. 
Selden, C. A. Everyman's garden in war time. 1917. 
Sudell, R. Practical gardening and food production in pictures. 1941. 
Uppman, E., ed. Visual garden manual. 1941. 
^Wredow, J. C. L. Wredow's Gartenfreund ; 12te aufl. vermehrt von H. 

Gaerdt und E. Neide. 1869. 

Dictionaries 

American Joint Committee on Horticultural Nomenclature. Standard- 
ized plant names; 2d ed. 1942. 

Bailey, L. H. and Bailey, E. Z., comp. Hortus II : a dictionary of gar- 
dening, horticulture and cultivated plants in North America. 1941. 

Seymour, E. L. D., ed. The garden encyclopedia; victory garden edi- 
tion. 1943. 

Children 

Bates, H. E. The seasons and the gardener. 1941. 

Propagation 

Deuber, C. G. Vegetative propagation of conifers. 1940. 
Kains, M. G. and McQuesten, L. M. Propagation of plants ; rev. and 
enl ed. 1942. 



* Books so indicated are to be used only in the reading room. 

28 



BOOKS ADDED TO THE LIBRARY 29 

Chemical culture 

. Matlin, D. R. Chemical gardening, latest developments in soilless cul- 
ture of plants. 1942. 
. Growing plants without soil ; 2d ed. rev. 1940. 

Special cultural techniques 

George, L. The moon sign book ; 1938 : astrology, the planetary daily 

guide for all ; 33d annual ed. 1937. 
Karasz, I. Astrological calendar for the gardener. 1941. 

Plant breeding 

Dobzhansky, T. Genetics and the origin of species; 2d ed. rev. 1941. 
Emerson, R. A. Genetic relations of plant colors in maize. 1921. 
Hayes, H. K. and Immer, F. R. Methods of plants breeding. 1942. 

AUXILIARY SCIENCES 

Chemistry 
*The Chemical formulary, v. 5. 1941. 

Soil science 

Bear, F. E. Soils and fertilizers; ed. 3. 1942. 
Collings, G. H. Commercial fertilizers; ed. 3, 1941. 
Gustaf son, A. F. Soils and soil management. 1941. 
Hambidge, G., ed. Hunger signs in crops. 1941. 
Howard, A. An agricultural testament. 1940. 
Kellogg, C. E. The soils that support us. 1941. 

Kramer, J. Relative efficiency of roots and tops of plants in protecting 
the soil from erosion. 1936. 

Miller, M. F. The soil and its management. 1933. 

Pfeiffer, E. Bio-dynamic farming and gardening; 2d ed. 1940. 

Plant pathology. General 

Crosby, C. R. and others. The control of diseases and insects affecting 

vegetable crops ; rev. ed. 1939. 
Levitt, J. Frost killing and hardiness of plants. 1941. 

Diseases 

Chester, K. S. The nature and prevention of plant diseases. 1942. 
Melhus, I. E. and Kent, G. C. Elements of plant pathology. 1939. 
Walker, J. C. Diseases of vegetable crops; ed. 2. 1939. 



30 MASSACHUSETTS HORTICULTURAL SOCIETY 

Insects 

Fernald, H. T. and Shepard, H. H. Applied entomology ; 4th ed. 1942. 
Lutz, F. E. A lot of insects. 1941. 

Needham, J. G. Introducing insects, a book for beginners. 1940. 
Peairs, L. M. Insect pests of farm, garden and orchard ; 4th ed. 1941. 

Weeds 
Muenscher, W. C. Weeds; rev. ed. 1942. 
Robbins, W. W. and others. Weed control, 1942. 

Plant protection 
Frear, D. E. H. Chemistry of insecticides and fungicides. 1942. 
Isely, D. Methods of insect control, parts 1 & 2. 1941-1942. 
Shepard, H. H. Chemistry and toxicology of insecticides. 1939. 

ORNAMENTAL PLANTS 

General 

Free, M. Pocket book of flower gardening. 1943. 

Lawrence, E. A southern garden, a handbook for the middle south, 

1942. 
Logan, H. B. and Putnam, J. -M. Science in the garden. 1941. 
Pratt, R. The picture garden book and gardener's assistant, with color 

photographs by Edward Steichen. 1942. 

Greenhouse and house plants 

Balthis, F. K. Plants in the home. 1941. 

Laurie, A. and Poesch, G. H. Commercial flower forcing; ed. 3. 1941. 

Rock gardening 
Mansfield, C. T. Alpines in color and cultivation. 1943. 

City gardening 
Allen, P. and Godfrey, Dr. Miniature and window gardening. 1902. 
Gomez, N. Your garden in the city. 1941. 

Perennials 

Hottes, A. C. Book of perennials; ed. 5. 1937. 
. Same;ed. 6. 1942. 



BOOKS ADDED TO THE LIBRARY 31 

Trees and shrubs 
Felt, E. P. Our shade trees; 2d ed. 1942. 

. Pruning trees and shrubs. 1941. 

Hottes, A. C. Bookof shrubs ; 4th ed. rev. 1942. 
. Bookof trees; 2d ed. 1942. 

Special 
Alexander, E. J. Succulent plants of new and old world deserts. 1942. 
Hennessey, R. Hennessey on roses. 1943. 
Lester, F.E. My friend the rose. 1942. 

Ramsbottom, J. Book of roses, 16 colored plates by Redoute. 1942. 
Rensselaer, M. van. Ceanothus : part 1, Ceanothus for gardens, parks 

and roadsides, by M. van Rensselaer; part 2, A systematic study of 

the genus Ceanothus by H. E. McMinn. 1942. 
Sander & Co. Addenda to Sander's list of orchid hybrids. 1937-1940. 
Schulz, E. D. Cactus culture; rev. ed. 1942. 

and Runyon, R. Texas cacti. 1930. 

White, E. A. American orchid culture; 3d ed. rev. and enl. 1942. 



ECONOMIC PLANTS 

General 

Cruess, W. V. Commercial fruit and vegetable products; 2d ed. 1938. 

'A Description and history of vegetable substances used in the arts and 
in domestic economy : timber trees, fruits, 1829. 

Hylander, C. J. Plants and man. 1941. 

Laufer, B. Sino-Iranica : Chinese contributions to the history of 
civilization in ancient Iran, history of cultivated plants and prod- 
ucts. 1919. 

National farm chemurgic council. The domestic production of essential 
oils from aromatic plants. 1940. 

Vegetables 

Bailey, L. H. Principles of vegetable gardening; 18th ed. 1941. 

Blair, E. The food garden. 1942. 

Boal, S. J. Gardening — without bunk. 1942. 

Burdett, J. H. Victory garden manual. 1943. 

Burrage, A. C. Twenty-minute-a-day garden. 1943. 

Chester county (Pa.) mushroom laboratories. Manual of mushroom 
culture, by G. R. Rettew, 3d ed. 1941. 

Cobb, E. Garden steps, a manual for the amateur in vegetable garden- 
ing. 1917. 



32 MASSACHtTSETTS HORTICULTURAIi SOCTBTT 

Coulter, F. C. A manual of home vegetable gardening. 1942. 

Dempsev, P. W. Grow your own vegetables. 1942. 

. Same; new ed. with The twenty-minute-a-day garden by A. C. 

Burrage. 1943. 

Everett, T. H. Victory backyard gardens : how to grow your own vege- 
tables. 1942. 

Farrington, E. I. The vegetable garden ; rev. and enl. 1942. 

Foley, D. J. Vegetable gardening in color. 1942. 

Fox, H. M. Gardening for good eating. 1943. 

Gast, R. H. Vegetables in the California garden : Victory garden ed. 
abridged. 1941. 

Hawkins, L. A. Have a victory garden. 1943. 

Kains, M. G. Food gardens for defense. 1942. 

Knott, J. E. Vegetable growing; ed. 3 rev. 1941. 

Lambert. L. F. Practical and scientific mushroom culture; 2d ed. 1941. 

Lloyd. J. W. Productive vegetable growing; 7th ed. 1942. 

Xissley, C. H. Home vegetable gardening. 1942. 

. The pocket book of vegetable gardening. 1942. 

Ogden, S. R. How to grow food for your family. 1942. 

Pfeiffer, E. Grow a garden and be self-sufficient. 1942. 

Putnam. J. -M. and Cosper. L. C. Gardens for victory. 1942. 

Bobbins, A. R. 2o vegetables anyone can gi'ow. 1942. 

Royal horticultural society. Vegetable gardening displayed : 300 illus- 
trations from photogi'aphs. 1941. 

Thompson, H. C. Asparagus production. 1942. 

. Vegetable crops. 3d ed. 1939. 

Tiedjens. V. A. Vegetable encyclopedia and gardener's guide. 1943. 

White, 0. E. Present state of knowledge of heredity and variation in 
peas. 1917. 

Work, P. The tomato. 1942. 

Truit 

Chandler, W. H. Deciduous orchards. 1942. 
Colby, A. S. Bramble fruits. 1940. 

Franklin, H. J. Cranberry growing in Massachusetts. 1940. 
Gourley, J. H. and Howlett. F. S. Modern fruit production. 1941. 
Kelley, V. W. Principles of tree and small fruit culture. 1937. 
Knapp, H. B. Growing tree and small fruits ; ed. 2. 1941. 
*White, J. J. Cranberry culture ; new and enl. ed. 1885. 

Herbs 
*Acosta, C. Ai-omatum et medicamentorum in Orientali India nascen- 

tium liber . . . Carolus Clusius . . . Latinus factus. 1582. 
*Bancke's Herbal: An herbal, 1525; ed. and transcribed with introduc- 
tion by S. V. Larkey and T. Pyles. 1941. 
Clarkson, R. E. Herbs, their culture and uses. 1942. 
McXair. J. B. Rhus dermatitis, its pathology and chemotherapy. 1923. 
*Markham, G. The English house-wife, now the 7th time much aug- 
mented by G. M. 1660. Facsim. ed. of book 2 chapter 1. 1942. 



BOOKS ADDED TO THE LIBRARY 33 

Soiinin, L de. Magic in herbs. 1941. 

Taylor, L. A. Plants used as curatives by certain southeastern tribes. 
1940. 

Webster, H. N. Herbs, how to grow them and and how to use them ; new 
ed. rev. and enl. 1942. 

Whitman, H. M., comp. Try growing herbs, a handbook for experi- 
menters. 1942. 

Special 

Cheney, R. H. Coffee, a monograph of the economic species of the genus 

CoffeaL. 1925. 
Dies, E. J. Soybeans, gold from the soil. 1942. 
Fults, J., comp. Grass: abstracts, references and reviews. 1935. 
'Klippart, J. H. The wheat plant, its origin, culture. 1860. 
Speck, F. G. Gourds of the southeastern Indians. 1941. 
Sperry, A. Bamboo, the wonder tree. 1942. 

. Coconut, the wonder tree. 1942. 

Ukers, W. H. All about coffee. 1935. 
. All about tea. 1935. 2 vols. 

Nutrition. Cooking 

American iMedical Association, Accepted foods and their nutritional 

significance. 1939. 
Bogert, L. J. Nutrition and physical fitness ; ed. 3. 1939. 
Borsook, H. Vitamins, what thev are and how the\' can benefit you. 

1940. 
Gamble, M. T. and Porter, M. C. To market, to market. 1940. 
McCollum, E. V. and Becker, J, E. Food, nutrition and health ; ed. 5, 

1940. 
Martin, G. W. Come and get it, the complete outdoor chef. 1942. 
Pierce, A., comp. and ed. Home canning for victory, also pickling, 

preserving, dehydrating. 1942. 
Rose, M.S. Feeding the family ; ed. 4. 1940. 

Sense, E. America's nutrition primer: what to eat and why. 1941. 
Stewart, J. J. Foods — production, marketing, consumption, 1938. 



GARDEN DESIGN 

General 
Goldsmith, M. 0. Designs for outdoor living. 1941. 
Johnson, L. R. How to landscape your grounds. 1941. 
King, E. A. Bible plants for American gardens. 1941. 
Lohmann, K. B. Landscape architecture in the modern world. 1941. 
Martin, W. S. Landscape plans for beautiful gardens. 1941. 
Morse, H. K. Garden easily : selected plants for easy gardening and 

ideas for their arrangement. 1942. 
Ortloff, H. S. Informal gardens, the naturalistic style. 1933. 
Patterson, S. Be your own gardener; ed. 2. 1941. 



34 MASSACHUSETTS HORTICUI/TURAL SOCIETY 

Popular Mechanics Co. The Popular Mechanics garden book. 1942. 
Root, R. R. Camouflage with planting. 1942. 

. Contourscaping. 1941. 

Steck, H. W. Right in your own backyard. 1942. 
Sunset Magazine. Sunset's barbecue book. 1939. 
Van Dersal, W. R. Ornamental American shrubs. 1942. 

Descriptions of gardens 

Betts, E. M. and Perkins, H. B. Thomas Jefferson's flower garden at 

Monticello. 1941. 
*Gromort, G. Jardins d'ltalie. 1922. 2v. 
Inn, H. Chinese houses and gardens. 1940. 

BOTANY 

General 

Daglish, E. F. How to see plants. 1936. 
*Hooker, W. The child's book of nature : part 1, Plants. 1857. 
Marx, D. S. Let's look at the plant world. 1942. 
Piatt, R. This green world. 1942. 

Dictionaries 

Clute, W. N. American plant names; ed. 3. 1940. 

. Common names of plants and their meanings ; ed. 2. 1942. 

Marshall, W. T. and Woods, R. S., comp. Glossary of succulent plant 

terms. 1938. 
Melander, A. L. Biological terms ; 2d ed. 1940. 

Structure and Functions 

Caldwell, J. S. Relation of environmental conditions to the phenomenon 

of permanent wilting in plants. 1913. 
Kraemer, H. Origin and nature of color in plants. 1904. 
Lloyd, F. E. Carnivorous plants. 1941. 
Lucas, J. M. Fruits of the earth. 1942. 
Molish, H. The longevity of plants; authorized Eng. ed. by E. H. 

Fulling. 1938. 
Nicol, H. Plant growth substances, their chemistry and applications; 

2d ed. 1940. 
Osterhout, W. J. V. Experiments with plants. 1905. 
Parker, B. M. Seeds and seed travels. 1941. 
Reed, H. S. A short history of the plant sciences. 1942. 

Descriptive botany- 
Fischer, H. F. The flower family album. 1941. 
Jacques, H. E. Plant families, how to know them. 1941. 
Pool, R. J. Flowers and flowering plants ; 2d ed. 1941. 
Robinson, F. B. Tabular keys for the identification of woody plants. 
1941. 



BOOKS ADDED TO THE LIBRARY 35 

Ecology 

Clausen, J. Experimental studies on the nature of species : I. Effect of 
varied environments on western North American plants. 1940. 

Clements, F. E. Plant succession and indicators. 1928. 

Klages, K. H. W. Ecological crop geography. 1942. 

McDougall, W. B. Plant ecology; 3d ed. rev. 1941. 

Martin, E. V. and Clements, F. E. Adaptation and origin in the plant 
world : I. Factors and functions in coastal dunes. 1939. 

Waller, A. E. Relation of plant succession to crop production. 1921. 

Weaver, J. E. and Clements, F. Plant ecology; 2d ed. 1938. 

Monographs 

Anderson, E. and Woodson, R. E. The species of Tradescantia indig- 
enous to the United States. 1935. 
*Baird, V. B. Wild violets of North America. 1942. 

Benson, L. and others. Cacti of Arizona, cultivation and distribution. 
1940. 

Boissevain, C. H. and Davidson, C. Colorado cacti. 1940. 

Christensen, C. M. Common edible mushrooms. 1943. 

Irish, H. C. Revision of the genus Capsicum. 1898. 

Krieger, L. C. C. Mushroom handbook. 1943. 

Marshall, W. T. and Bock, T. M. Cactacese. 1941. 

Large, E. C. The advance of the fungi. 1940. 

Ownbey, M. Monograph of the genus Calochortus. 1940. 

Walther, E. Notes on the genus Echeveria. 

White A, and others. The succulent Euphorbieae (southern Africa). 
1941. 2 vols. 

Floras 

Blake, S. F. and Atwood, A. C. Geographical guide to floras of the 
world : an annotated list with special reference to useful plants and 
common plant names : pt. I. Africa, Australia, North America, South 
America, Islands of the oceans. 1942. 

Collingwood, G. H. Knowing your trees : rev. ed. 1941. (U.S.) 

Collins, J. F. and Preston, H. W. Key to New England trees. 1909. 

Graham, E. and McMinn, H. E. Ornamental shrubs and woody vines of 
the Pacific coast, with a chapter on the structure and functions of 
flowering plants. 1941. 

Jacobs, B. E. and Boli, L. R. Our trees, 1942. (Southern states). 

Jacques, H. E. How to know the trees. 1940. (U.S.) 

Jaeger, E. C. Desert wild flowers; 2d ed. 1941. (Southwest.) 

McMinn, H. E. Illustrated manual of California shrubs. 1939. 

Marx, D. S. The American book of the woods. 1940. 

Moscoso, R. M. Las cactaceas de la flora de Santo Domingo. 1941. 

Pammel, L. H. Weed flora of Iowa; rev. ed. 1926. 

Peck, M. E. Manual of the higher plants of Oregon. 1941. 

Pesman, M. W. Meet the natives, central Rocky Mountain region. 1942. 

Rafinesque, C. S. Autikon botanicon : icones plantarum select, plerum- 
que americana. facsimile lithograph. 1942. 



* 



36 MASSACHUSETTS HORTICULTURAL SOCIETY 

Skene, M. A flower book for the pocket. 1941. (Great Britain). 
Tarbox, F. G. Brookgreen gardens (South Carolina), list of plants. 

1940. 
Tidestrom, I. and Kittell, Sister T. A flora of Arizona and New Mexico. 

1941. 
Vermont botanical club. Flora of Vermont ; 3d ed. 1937. 
Walther, E. Collecting succulents in Mexico. 1935. 
Woeikoff, A. D. What can the Manchurian flora give to gardens. 1941. 

CONSERVATION 

American Forests. American conservation in picture and story; rev. 
ed. 1941. 

AGRICULTURE 

* American husbandry; ed. by H. J. Carman. 1942. 
Benson, A. E. History of the Massachusetts Society for Promoting 

Agriculture, 1892-1942. 
Borth, C. Pioneers of plenty: the story of chemurgy; new and enl. 

wartime ed. 1942. 
Demaree, A. L. American agricultural press 1819-1860. 1941. 
Gray,, L. C. and Thompson, E. K. History of agriculture in the southern 

United States to 1860. 1942. 2 vols. 
Leonard, W. H. and Clark, A. G. Field plot technique. 1930. 
McGee, R. V. Mathematics in agriculture. 1942. 
Massachusetts Society for Promoting Agriculture. An outline of the 

history of the Society. 1942. 
United States Department of Agriculture. An historical survey of 

American agriculture. 1941. 
United States Census Bureau. 16th census. 1940. Agriculture, vol. 1 

parts 2-6, vol. 2 parts 2-3. 1942. 
*Woodward, C. R. Ploughs and politicks: Charles Read of New Jersey 

and his Notes on agriculture 1715-1774. 1941. 

FORESTRY 

Harvard University. Harvard forest, Petersham, Mass. The Harvard 
Forest models. 1941. 

Mills, E. A. The story of a 1000 year pine. 1914. 

Toumey, J. W. and Korstian, C. F. Seeding and planting in the practice 
of forestry ;ed. 3. 1942. 

Baldwin, H. I. Forest tree seed with special reference to North Amer- 
ica. 1942. 

NATURE STUDY ~ 

Baker, J. H., ed. The Audubon guide to attracting birds. 1941. 
Hylander, C. J. Out of doors in spring. 1942. 

Teale, E. W. Byways to adventure : a guide to nature hobbies. 1942. 
. The golden throng, a book about bees. 1940. 



BOOKS ADDED TO THE LIBRARY 37 

FINE ARTS 

G-eneral 

Giedion, S. Space, time and architecture. 1941. 

Royal Horticultural Society. Horticultural colour chart. 1939-1942. 

2 vols. 
Temple, V. How to draw wild flow^ers. 1942. 

Flower Arrangement 
Farrar, E. F. Flower arrangements in Virginia. 1942. 
Sunset Magazine. Sunset's flower arrangement book. 1942. 
Watson, M. Arranging flowers. 1941. 

Flower Shows 

National Council of State Garden Clubs, Inc. Handbook of flower show 
judging. 1942. 

Essays 

Dowling, A. The flora of the sacred nativity. 1900. 

Farnham, D. The embattled male in the garden. 1941. 

Galpin, F. W. In the garden of the Lord. 1942. 

Jones, L. S. Have patience little saint. 1941. 

Lord, E. L. A gardener's pick-up book. 1942. 

McKinney, L. Garden clubs and spades. 1941. 

Palmer, C. and Putnam, J. M. Who's zoo in the garden. 1941. 

Quinn, V. Vegetables in the garden and their legends. 1942. 

Symington, E. By light of sun. 1941. 

Temple, W. On the gardens of Epicurus, with other XVIIth century 

garden essays; intro. by A. Forbes Sieveking. 1908. 
Wright, P. H. Weeds are more fun. 1941. 

Biography 

Curtis, W. H. William Curtis, F.L.S., 1746-1799, botanist and ento- 
mologist. 1942. 

Fitzpatrick, T. J. Rafinesque, a sketch of his life with bibliography, 
1911. 

Floy, M. The diary of Michael Floy, Jr., Bowery Village, 1833-1837; 
ed. by R. A. E. Brooks, with annotations by Margaret Floy Wash- 
burn. 1941. 

Peattie, D. C. The road of a naturalist. 1941. 

Pellett, K. Pioneers in Iowa horticulture. 1941. 

Rodgers, A. D., III. John Torrey: a story of North American botany. 
1942. 

Taylor, H. J. To plant the prairies and the plains : the life and work 
of Niels Ebbesen Hansen. 1941. 

TRAVEL 

Goodspeed, T. H. Plant hunters in the Andes. 1941. 



Benevolent Fraternity Fruit and 
Flower Mission 

The Benevolent Fraternity Fruit and Flower Mission starts 
today its 75th year of continuous service and it is privileged once 
again to express its sincere appreciation to the trustees of the 
Massachusetts Horticultural Society for its headquarters room in 
the basement of Horticultural Hall, for the unfailing co-opera- 
tion of Mr. Farrington and the increased interest of Mr. Graves. 
Many people have spoken of the latter's broadcast references to 
our work. 

The outstanding feature of the past year should go down in the 
annals of our organization as a tribute to the loyalty of our 
friends who carried on the work in the midst of the difficulties 
and the many calls for service in our war torn world. 

Seven hundred and sixty-six hampers, cartons, etc., were re- 
ceived during the hamper season, only 10 less than the peak season 
of 1941. 

Duxbury held its place as the banner town, with Lexington 
second and Grafton and the Scituate Garden Club tied for third 
place. 

In Needham on the opening day one of the schools packed the 
baskets. Three boys carried the three filled hampers in their carts 
a half mile to the station and the teacher in charge rode on her 
bicycle so that tires were saved. 

The Newton Centre Garden Club brought direct to Horticul- 
tural Hall on Wednesday mornings 2356 individual bouquets, all 
tied, 856 from one garden. They also contributed 44 filled Christ- 
mas baskets. 

The 1942 Thanksgiving distribution was the largest in our his- 
tory, followed by a wonderful Christmas and successful Easter. 

The West Newton Garden Club brought in 36 filled baskets. 

Many garden clubs and groups contributed generously to the 
397 holiday baskets. 

People shared their personal stocks on cupboard shelves and 
automobile drivers saved gasoline to make the trips to the suburbs 
or contributed money for the use of taxis for the short runs in 
the city, to carry cheer to those on our list. 

Mrs. Geoffrey G. Whitney kindly contributed 35 Spring flower 
show tickets for special recipients. 

The Fruit and Flower Mission is rich in its friends. 

Emily I. Elliott, Executive Secretary. 

38 



Necrolog 



y 



The following is a list of the members of the Massachusetts 
Horticultural Society whose deaths were reported during the year 
ending May 1, 1943. 



Mr. William Andej'son 

Mr. William J. Backes 

Mrs. Edith I. Ball 

Mr. Adolphe F. J. Baur 

Mr. WiUard W. Beals 

Mrs. Walter C. Bell 

Miss Susan R. Benedict 

Mr. Hugh Beveridge 

Mrs. Paul Bigelow 

Mrs. Charles Sumner Bird 

Mr. Richards M. Bradley 

Mr. Bennet B. Bristol 

Mrs. M. S. Burnhome 

Mrs. Rose V. Busby 

Miss Margaret S. Bush 

Mrs. Alfred M. Butler 

Mrs. Arthur H. Chandler 

Mrs. Harry M. Cheney 

Miss Emma L. Coleman 

Mrs. Joseph H. Collins 

Mrs. Minton Converse 

Mrs. Edmond Cote 

Mrs. G. Glover Crocker 

Mrs. Arthur E. Davis 

Mr. Arthur Edward Davis, Jr. 

Mr. Charles 0. Dexter 

Mr. William Dexter 

Mr. Louis Dupuy 

Mrs. William F. Eastwood 

Miss Mary G. Ellis 

Mr. William Endicott 

Mrs. Walter Evans 

Mr. George B. Farrington 

Mr. Erland F. Fish 

Mrs. Thomas L. Fisher 

Mrs. C. Mifflin Frothingham 

Mr. George B. Gill 

Mr. Henry C. Goehl 

Mr. Leonard H. Goodhue 

Mr. L. Winthrop Grenville 

Mrs. Russell Grinnell 

Miss F. Josephine Hall 

Mr. Arthur A. Hansen 

Mrs. P. C. Headley, Jr. 

Mrs. Philip B. Heintz 

Mr. H. D. Hem en way 

Mr. George Holliday 



Miss Valentine Hollingsworth 

Mr. W. D. Howard 

Miss Margaret C. Hussey 

Mrs. Edward W. Hutchins 

Mrs. Laurence G. Kemble 

Mr. Arthur Langer 

Mr. Antoine Leuthy 

Mr. William B. MacColl 

Mrs. Gordon P. Marshall 

Mrs. Thomas Motley, Sr. 

Mr. Hallam L. Movius 

Mrs. Arthur C. Nason 

Mr. Sam P. Negus 

Miss Emma M. Nichols 

Mrs. Eben B. Page 

Mrs. George E. Percy 

Mrs. H. K. Porter 

Mr. Arthur W. Potter, Jr. 

Mrs. J. Frederick Price 

Miss Elizabeth S. Rawlinson 

Mr. James S. Reardon 

Miss Elsie C. Reed 

Miss Ida B. Reed 

Mr. James Routledge 

Mrs. Irving W. Sargent 

Mr. Robert W. Sayles 

Mr. Frank A. Schirmer 

Mr. Max Schling 

Dr. Henry F. Sears 

Capt. Louis Shane, U. S. N. 

Mr. Francis Shaw 

Mrs. F. E. Smith 

Mrs. Henry B. Sprague 

Mr. Edmund Q. Sylvester 

Mrs. Arthur W. Tedcastle 

Mr. David Tyndall 

Mr. Winthrop L. Wallis 

Miss Ellen L. Watts 

Mr. Fred Putnam Webber 

Miss Isabel Webber 

Miss Mary E. Welch 

Mrs. Alfred R. Weld 

Mrs. C. Minot Weld 

Mrs. Charles G. Weld 

Mr. Gordon B. Wellman 

Mrs. Franklin D. Williams 

Miss Agnes G. Wright 



39 




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MASSACHUSETTS HORTICULTURAL 

SOCIETY 



REPORTS 

OF THE 

OFFICERS AND COMMITTEES 



Presented at the 
ANNUAL MEETING, MAY 3, 1943 




Several prominent Chinese women appeared in costume- at the Autumn 
Show in 1942, at which time Chinese gardens were given prominence. 



The Annual Meeting, 1943 

The annual meeting of the Massachusetts Horticultural Society 
was held in Horticultural Hall at 3 :00 p.m. on Monday, May 3, 
1943. The president, ]\ir. Edwin S. Webster, was in the chair and 
named as tellers, Mr. James Geehan, Mrs. Margaret Peters, Mrs. 
Elizabeth Stejffek and Miss Faith Freeman. The secretary read 
the call for the meeting, after which the president presented his 
annual address, which was followed by the reports of the secretary, 
the treasurer and the chairmen of the various committees. 



The President's Address 

It is not to be expected that this Society can carry on its activities 
in a normal manner under the abnormal conditions which exist 
now throughout the world. In company with the Horticultural 
Society of New York and the Pennsylvania Horticultural Society, 
we have lost a considerable number of members. From the high 
point of 9,000 members some years ago we are now down to slightly 
under 7,000 and are sustaining continued losses as members go 
into the army, or as families move to distant parts of the country, 
or become engaged in some kind of war work which divorces them 
from horticultural interests. 

However, these losses are being compensated for to a consider- 
able extent by the addition of new members brought about through 
increased interest in victory gardens. A large number of persons 
have come to learn about Horticultural Hall and its work for the 
first time through the victory garden program and as a result of 
the recent flower show held here. We feel that we are greatly 
extending our influence, therefore, and that we shall be able to 
reach a greater number of members than ever before. 

One of the most interesting developments along this line lies in 
the fact that this is becoming somewhat of a national organization, 
although without any planning in this direction. In recent j^ears, 
and particularly in recent months, we have been receiving mem- 
bership applications from horticulturally minded persons in many 
parts of the country. As a matter of fact, we now have members 
in 31 different states. This membership extends across the country 
all the way to California. Probably it is accounted for in large 
measure by the prestige which has been acquired by our library. 
The fact is generally accepted, that this is the outstanding horti- 
cultural library in the country and that no other library is so 
prompt in obtaining all the new horticultural books as fast as they 

43 



44 MASSACHUSETTS HORTICULTURAL SOCIETY 

are published, or in providing opportunities for research by means 
of old or rare books and a very extensive catalogue collection. 
Books are borrowed by our distant members in increasing num- 
bers and we receive many pleasant letters about this service. You 
may be interested to know that many of the books which are 
borrowed from the library are sent by mail. Shipments of books 
go out and come in every day. 

I made reference a minute ago to this year's Spring show. As 
you all know, this was the only major Spring flower exhibition 
in the entire country. We were somewhat in doubt as to how it 
Avould be received, but the messages of commendation and con- 
gratulation which have come to us from many quarters, locally 
and at a distance, indicate almost unanimous approval. By hold- 
ing the show in our own building we naturally restricted its scope 
and limited the attendance. On the other hand, we gave a much 
more attractive background to the exhibits than ever was possible 
in Mechanics Building, and what was more, we introduced thou- 
sands of persons to the home of this Society, thus giving an im- 
petus to our work which should be felt for a long time. The 
exhibition committee planned this show on a 50 per cent basis as 
compared with previous exhibitions in Mechanics Building. That 
is to say, expenses were figured at about half the Mechanics 
Building average and it was estimated that the average attend- 
ance would be about half as many as in the hall down the street. 
For the most part these figures worked out about as expected, 
although the attendance ran to 57,000, which is a little better 
than 50 per cent of the average in former years. 

This show was participated in to a very great extent by the 
garden clubs, a fact which accounts in large measure for its suc- 
cess. This Society is grateful to the garden clubs for the very 
hearty support given the show by them in these trying times. 

As was to be expected, much emphasis was placed on the war 
effort throughout the life of the show. Three lectures were given 
each day on food production and food preservation. The attend- 
ance at these lectures was large and evidently most of those pres- 
ent, and many others also, visited the exhibit of the state college, 
which was an outstanding feature of the show, for more than 
10,000 applications for gardening bulletins were turned in. I 
feel that what was accomplished along educational lines alone 
justified the efforts put into this show, although the matter of 
morale, relaxation and mental uplift ought not to be overlooked. 

What form the rest of the shows this year will take has not been 
fully decided, but we intend to continue our exhibitions through- 



ANNUAL MEETING, 1943 45 

out the Summer and Fall months. Probably the chairman of the 
exhibition committee will give you more information on this 
point. Our classes will also be continued along the lines already 
developed with speakers every Friday afternoon and evening and 
with canning and nutrition demonstrations several times a week 
in July and August. 

The secretary of the Society is a member of the state garden 
committee appointed b}^ Governor Saltonstall, and so far all the 
meetings of this committee have been held in this building under 
the direction of Dr. Hugh Baker, president of the Massachusetts 
State College, who is chairman of the committee. The director 
of exhibitions for the Society is secretary of the city garden com- 
mittee appointed by Mayor Tobin and has been active in devel- 
oping the work of this committee on a practical and city wide 
basis. The building has been open without charge for various war 
activities such as the registration of draftees and social affairs 
for soldiers and sailors. The secretary has been instructed to co- 
operate by every means which presents itself, aiding the war effort 
and the work of the Red Cross. Incidentally, about $1,000 was 
turned over to the Red Cross following the Spring show, this 
being the amount of money thrown into the wishing well. 

One of our long time trustees, Robert G. Stone, represents the 
Board in the United States army, and is now holding the rank 
of captain. Edwin F. Steffek, one of the secretary's assistants, is 
also with our armed forces, and manj^ of the men who have been 
active in the work of the Society are now in the army or in the 
navy. We miss them and wish them ''God speed." 

Our Society is not marking time but is adjusting its activities 
to the difficult situation which now confronts it. More than ever 
we act as a clearing house for ideas and as a source of information 
on all phases of gardening. The members of our staff are con- 
stantly being called upon for consultation and advice by personal 
visit, over the telephone and by letter. They are frequently called 
upon to speak before various groups and keep in close touch with 
Washington and local government agencies in order to be in- 
formed about the latest rulings and regulations which affect gar- 
dening. It is the kind of work which requires a constant expendi- 
ture of time, effort and money with little or no financial returns. 
Various economies are being made to help overcome this handicap, 
however, and the Society seems likely to end the year without 
serious losses. 

In any event, the trustees realize that the Massachusetts Horti- 
cultural Society was organized and has always operated as an 



46 MASSACHUSETTS HORTICULTURAL SOCIETY 

agency for good works and feel that whatever sacrifices are re- 
quired now should be accepted without complaint and with no 
lessening in our efforts to be of service. 

Edwin S. Webstek, President. 

The Secretary's Report 

As might be expected, this Society is devoting itself largely to 
one highly important phase of war work — aiding in preparations 
for greatly increased production of food crops on the part of 
amateurs. Horticultural Hall has become a clearing house for 
information on victory gardens and has assembled a surprisingly 
large amount of literature on the subject, including important 
bulletins from many distant states. 

The secretary is acting temporarily as county agent for Suffolk 
county and, therefore, is in charge of the distribution of state 
college material in this section. Hundreds of bulletins are going 
out from this building with the stamp of government authority. 
The Society is also giving out large numbers of victory garden 
manuals printed in color, as well as reprints of vegetable planting 
tables originally published in Horticulture. 

The Society's director of exhibitions, Arno Nehrling, is secre- 
tary of Mayor Tobin's City Committee and meetings of this com- 
mittee or various members of the committee are held frequently 
in Horticultural Hall. 

A miniature demonstration garden constructed by Harold Bent 
of Framingham has been set up in the entrance hall for several 
months, being given much attention. 

The members of the staff are constantly being called upon to 
answer questions on different phases of gardening, not all of them 
being confined to victory gardens by any means. In addition, the 
Society has had the assistance of several outside authorities who 
have given their services in conducting classes here. Those who 
have aided us in this way so far are Mr. Bent, Dr. Donald Wyman 
of the Arnold Arboretum, Sydney Kimpton of Hingham, Dr. 
Donovan S. Correll of the Harvard Botanical Museum and George 
Sweetser of Wellesley. 

At each of the lectures, books and pamphlets to be found in 
the library are displayed and those available for free distribu- 
tion are given away. It should be understood, however, that the 
Society is not giving up its interest in ornamental horticulture. 
On the contrary, it believes that the mental tonic which comes 
from the cultivation of flowers and flowering plants justifies the 



ANNUAL MEETING, 1943 47 

expenditure of a certain amount of time in that direction. The 
members of the staff are just as ready to answer questions having 
to do with ornamental material as those connected with food 
production. Nevertheless, the emphasis is and must be on the 
growing and preservation of vegetables and fruits in anticipation 
of shortages the coming Winter. 

The necessity of carrying on canning operations and providing 
storage facilities is paramount and the Society is endeavoring to 
disseminate the most accurate and reliable information along 
these lines which can be obtained. So much has been written about 
home gardening, some of it altogether contradictory, that many 
amateurs have become bewildered. Efforts are being made to 
clear up such difficulties and keep confused amateurs on the right 
track. 

The sale of the books sponsored by the Society has continued 
good, and one of these books, "The Gardener's Almanac," has 
become the Society's exclusive property. The large edition of "The 
Gardener's Omnibus" originally printed has been exhausted and 
this book probably will not be reprinted, at least for the present, 
because of war-time restrictions on paper and the large expense 
involved. 

The Society's magazine has had some hard problems to meet 
because of the falling off in the membership of the three societies 
standing behind it — the societies in Massachusetts, New York and 
Pennsylvania. The circulation has been maintained at about 
35,000 but much additional work has been required to build up 
an outside circulation to offset the loss occasioned by members 
who have resigned. Also, of course, there has been a shrinkage in 
advertising revenue, inasmuch as many advertisers have been 
unable to continue in business. 

A continuous shift in membership is now under way. Many 
persons who have been members for years have had to discontinue 
their membership because of joining the armed forces, or moving 
to other parts of the country or being forced to give lip their 
gardening activities. The loss brought about in this way has been 
compensated for in large measure by the addition of new mem- 
bers, many of whom have known nothing about the Society or its 
activities in past years. The interest of these persons has been 
aroused through our broadcasts, through articles published in 
Horticulture, through classes being conducted here and through 
the Spring flower show. 

The fact that the flower show was held in Horticultural Hall 
this year was most advantageous from the viewpoint of the 



48 MASSACHUSETTS HORTICULTURAL SOCIETY 

membersliip committee. Hundreds of persons who had never been 
above the first floor passed through the offices and the library, 
many of them stopping to ask questions and showing a distinct 
interest in what they saw. Many names and addresses were taken 
at this show and these names are being used in an effort to increase 
the membership of the Society, which now stands at about 6,700. 

The Society has aroused much interest with its bulletin on 
poison ivy, which has been circulated and reprinted throughout 
the country. A new bulletin on ragweed has also been well re- 
ceived. Both of these were written by George Graves. The bulle- 
tin on grape culture by Dr. Walter G. Kendall, first issued several 
years ago, has been revised and is now being reprinted. 

Because of curtailed income, all possible economies are being put 
into effect and little is being done in the way of repairs or build- 
ing improvements. Blackout curtains were installed over much 
of the building last year, but a few extra curtains were needed 
in preparation for the Spring show. It became necessary also to 
provide a dimout arrangement under the skylight of the large 
exhibition hall, a problem which required considerable time and 
effort before it was solved. 

It would have been impossible to open the upper floors for the 
Spring show without the use of the large elevator which was 
installed last year. The new door on Massachusetts Avenue also 
proved its usefulness. It is possible that measures will be de- 
veloped for adding to the exhibition space in Horticultural Hall 
if the trustees decide that the Spring exhibitions are to be con- 
tinued here. However it is not likely that much can be done along 
this line while the war lasts. 

The secretary wishes to express his gratitude to the trustees and 
committees for their kindness and support throughout the year, 
and extends his thanks to the members of the staff for their co- 
operation and help. 

Edward I. Farrington, Secretary. 



ANNUAL MEETING, 1943 49 

Report of the Treasurer 

STATEMENT OF FINANCIAL CONDITION AT 
DECEMBER 31, 1942 

Assets 

Cash in Banks and on Hand $ 41,423.47 

Treasurer: In bank $ 19,604.81 

In hands of broker 14,939.41 

Bursar: In bank 6,869.25 

On hand 10.00 



$ 41,423.47 

Investments — Valued at cost — schedule A-1 531,300.03 

Capital Assets— see note 1 582,289.41 

Real Estate $498,564.63 

Improvements and additions to buildings 37,144,31 

Library 46,580.47 



$582,289.41 
Deferred Charges : Spring show, 1943 2,017.95 



$1,157,030.86 
Liabilities and Capital Funds 

Liabilities — Accounts payable $ 8.25 

Sundry Funds — schedule A-2 457,796.57 

Special uses : Principal $167,028.11 

Unexpended income 10,725.16 

$177,753.27 

General uses : Principal 280,043.30 



$457,796.57 

Donations Special 827.18 

Life Membership Fees 23,644.00 

Mount Auburn Cemetery Fund 55,053.52 

Library Cataloguing Fund 751.52 

Capital 564,524.70 

Surplus (Capital) 47,940.15 

Balance, January 1, 1942 $ 54,525.09 

Deduct : Net loss on sales of securities 6,584.94 



$ 47,940.15 
Surplus (Earned) at December 31, 1942— exhibit B 6,484.97 

$1,157,030.86 



50 



MASSACHUSETTS HOETICULTURAL SOCIETY 



STATEMENT OF INCOME AND EXPENDITURES 

Income Year Ended Year Ended 

Income from investments and December 31, 1942 December 31, 1941 
bank interest (less proportion 

allocated to restricted funds) $26,167.78 $25,545.00 

Membership fees 17,695.30 19,003.50 

Rentals 3,656.01 4,764.81 

Spring Show, 1942 — schedule 

B-1 17,376.88 

Spring Show, 1941 — schedule 

B-1 37,238.42 

Incidentals 1,409.16 298.55 

Sundry donations 8.00 15.00 

$66,313.11 $86,865.28 

EXPENDITUEES 

Operating Expenses 

Building expenses $19,644.86 $25,164.13 

Library expenses 6.457.41 6,159.19 

Office and general expenses . 33,615.87 39,074.57 

Misc. exhibition expenses . . 5,909.72 6,510.10 

Autumn Show, 1942 

Autumn Show, 1941 999.63 

War Activities 23.35 

$65,651.21 $77,907.62 

Awards, Lectures, and Miscellaneous : 

Lectures 278.95 56.14 

Medals and certificates 1,010.51 524.40 

Prizes in excess of funds . . . 931.45 719.50 

2,220.91 1,300.04 

Add : Horticulture loss — 

schedule B-2 3,237.16 645.84 

Excess of Income Over $71,109.28 $79,853.50 

Expenditures $ 7,011.78 

Excess of Expenditures Over 

Income $ 4,796.17 

Balance of Earned Surplus at 

January 1, 1942 13,105.22 

Deduct : Charges to earned sur- 8,309.05 

plus, as directed by Board 

of Trustees, Jan. "^6, 1942 

Blackout expense 684.08 

Cataloging 750.00 

Bonus paid employees 390.00 

1,824.08 

Earned Surplus at December 

31, 1942— exhibit A $ 6,484.97 

John S. Ames, Treasurer, 



ANNUAL MEETING, 1943 51 

Report of the Library Committee 

In spite of the dislocating influence of the war, the Library 
Committee reports satisfactory activity in most phases of the 
work during the past year. Statistics are as follows : 

1941 1942 Gain or Loss 



Books loaned 


4,303 


3,993 


—310 


Packages mailed 


1,122 


1^27 


+5 


" " (postage) 


$55.35 


$74.17 


+$18.82 


" " (refunds) 


$47.44 


$65.42 


+$17.98 


Fines paid 


$130.78 


$101.06 


—$36.85 



All libraries are reporting a drop in circulation, for the war 
still draws people away from reading, as it did a year ago. Our 
decrease of about 14 per cent is not disturbing. The gasoline 
shortage has been the most important factor in bringing it about, 
for many members depended on their cars to transport themselves 
and their books. Offsetting this there has been a small increase 
in the number of packages mailed to readers, in spite of an in- 
crease in book post rates. There has been a correspondingly high 
percentage of postage refunds on packages mailed, and a marked 
promptness in returning books. We are also pleased to be able 
to report that a large number of those who join or retain their 
memberships are being attracted to or held in the Society by the 
services of the library. 

About a year ago libraries in the coastal areas were putting 
their treasures into safe storage and this committee investigated 
several possible hideouts. A survey made by the Building Com- 
mittee showed that Horticultural Hall is in many respects one 
of the safest buildings in the city, and that the risks and expense 
of outside storage were unnecessary. By packing some books that 
are rarely needed and rearranging part of the collection, we found 
well-protected storage for the most valuable of our books, and at 
the same time kept them available for use. We do not know of 
any other library so fortunate. 

The staff has been affected most by war conditions. Two mem- 
bers resigned to work for the federal government, and their places 
are not being filled. This has made it necessary to suspend work 
on the recataloguing project, and to close the library on Saturday 
afternoons the year round. It was expected that the current drive 
for victory vegetable gardens would increase demands on the 
library. But so many other agencies — state college and extension 
service, town committees, and newspapers — have undertaken to 
give advice that the load has been well distributed. This has made 



52 MASSACHUSETTS HORTICULTURAL SOCIETY 

it possible for the two remaining staff members to keep abreast 
of the work. 

Last Fall the American Orchid Society asked for an option on 
any books from the Albert C. Burr age library that might be for 
sale. Acting under powers already given them by the trustees, the 
committee authorized the sale of any books that were not needed 
for our own shelves. Lists were published at intervals in the 
bulletin of the American Orchid Society and the sales to date 
have brought a net profit of $2352.49. 

The garden clubs, horticultural societies and garden centers 
have kept up their interest in the loan collection of club year 
books, and a full schedule of reservations for them has been car- 
ried. Requests come from as far as Fort Worth, Texas. These loans 
are generally planned to form a feature exhibit at large meetings, 
and requests come year after year from the same groups for the 
same dates. 

Members of the library staif have also had opportunities to 
talk about garden books to nearby clubs. We should like it better 
known that the library offers such a program free to any club, 
provided the club comes to the library. The program can be more 
varied and more easily suited to the interests of the group than 
is possible with a paper prepared to be read at a meeting held 
elsewhere. 

In February the library was host to the Boston Chapter of the 
Special Libraries Association. Mr. Farrington spoke on current 
victory garden problems to an interested and responsive audience. 
As librarians, thinking of buying for their own institutions, the 
visitors studied thoroughly our large collection of books and 
pamphlets on victory gardening. 

The return of the Spring flower show to this building drew 
the library into the midst of show activities. Most of the alcoves 
became exhibit space and the central floor area was filled with 
chairs for the daily lectures. Thus many people visited the read- 
ing room for the first time, friends were made, interest roused, 
and the way opened, we hope, for future usefulness. 

C. K. CuMMiNGS, Chairman. 

Report of the Exhibition Committee 

Considering the unsettled conditions which have prevailed dur- 
ing the past year, I am happy to report for the exhibition 
committee that the past year was successful in all respects. The 
continued interest in our shows on the part of exhibitors was most 
encouraging, while the attendance at all shows held up remark- 



54 MASSACHUSETTS HORTICULTURAL SOCIETY 

ably well. Attendance records were broken at the harvest show 
and at the children's show. As you know, the Massachusetts Hor- 
ticultural Society held the only large show in the country this 
Spring, and I am happy to report that this was not only an out- 
standing exhibition, but that the show was a distinct financial 
success. 

Because of developing interest in lilies, a lily show was added 
to the list of exhibitions, and it is planned to repeat this during 
the coming season. The committee planned and supervised 11 
exhibitions. Further, in accordance with President Webster's in- 
structions, the exhibition committee worked closely with the prize 
committee. Copies of the minutes of each meeting were sent to 
the members of the prize committee, so that all members of the 
latter group were familiar at all times with the work of the 
exhibition committee, and everj^ member of the exhibition com- 
mittee received copies of the minutes of the prize committee. This 
procedure developed a mutual understanding of all problems 
between the two committees. 

The exhibition committee appreciated the presence of Vice- 
President Ellery, who served on both committees. Because of his 
wide experience, his advice was of great value to both committees. 
President "Webster's advice and counsel was also of great value. 

When it was decided to transfer the Spring show from the 
Mechanics Building to Horticultural Hall, after 12 successive ex- 
hibitions in the former building, the committee and the show mana- 
ger were faced with a number of new problems. The schedule had 
to be entirely rearranged to meet the conditions in the smaller ex- 
hibition space in Horticultural Hall. A new budget had to be 
prepared and many changes made in the building to improve it 
for show purposes. Even after plans for the entire building had 
been adopted, changes had to be made continuously to meet new 
conditions. Thus, as an example, the original plan for the lecture 
hall was for a series of small gardens with a wide aisle. Shortly 
before the Spring show was scheduled a request was received for 
more space for orchid exhibits, and this proposed orchid exhibit 
developed to such an extent that eventually the entire hall, with 
the exception of the stage, was given over to orchids. The result 
was most eminently satisfactory. 

Happily the Spring show developed according to expectations, 
both from the standpoint of exhibits and from that of attendance. 
The building was overcrowded at times, especially early in the 
week. In the coming year some of the congestion that occurred 
on the second and third floors can be avoided by reducing the 



ANNUAL MEETING, 1943 66 

number of exhibits and widening the aisles. The show manager 
and the committee learned a great deal from this experience about 
handling traffic, and in another year some of the mistakes that 
were made this year can be corrected. 

The attendance totalled 56,792 as compared with 89,020 in the 
Mechanics Building in 1942. There were many outstanding ex- 
hibits, and among them mention should be made of the Old New 
England House and Garden staged by Sherman Eddy; Albert 
Hulley's rose garden; the waterfall and rock garden staged by 
Alexander Irving Heimlich ; the magnificent collection of acacias 
from the estate of Mrs. Galen L. Stone; Mr. Walke's amaryllis 
exhibit; and Will C. Curtis' exhibit of rare and unusual plants. 
There were many other outstanding exhibits, and the combined 
orchid displays were considered by all experienced observers to 
be the finest display ever staged in North America. L. Sherman 
Adams deserves special mention for the assistance he gave to the 
committee in planning and staging the orchid exhibits. 

The Georgian dining room and the flower arrangements staged 
by the Garden Club Federation of Massachusetts under the direc- 
tion of Mrs. Harold Plimpton attracted much attention. This was 
also true of the plant windows planned by Mrs. Irving C. Wright, 
a member of this committee. 

The victory garden lectures in the library were constantly 
crowded. The victory garden information center conducted by the 
Massachusetts State College, was most popular, and the members 
of the staff of the agricultural extension service of that institution 
are to be congratulated for the grand job that they accomplished. 
They received a total of 10,570 requests for literature. This means 
that one out of every five visitors to the show registered at the 
information center. The office of the extension service at Amherst 
sent out 38,000 bulletins and circulars to those who applied for 
them at the show. 

At a recent meeting, the committee voted to recommend to the 
Board of Trustees that a Spring flower show be held in Horti- 
cultural Hall in 1944, dates to be selected later. The committee 
also voted to recommend to the Board of Trustees that all the 
other shows listed in the schedule for 1942-1943 be repeated in the 
year 1943-44. 

The committee wishes to commend to the Board of Trustees the 
outstanding services of the show manager, Mr. Arno H. Nehrling, 
for without his constant and intelligent attention to details we 
feel that it would have been impossible to have attained the high 
degree of excellence that characterized all shows during the past 



56 



MASSACHUSETTS HORTICULTURAL SOCIETY 



year staged under his immediate supervision. We also wish to 
extend our sincere appreciation to all members of the prize com- 
mittee for its cordial co-operation. From the year's experience it 
is believed that it is highly essential to the success of all exhibi- 
tions that all members of both of these important committees be 
constantly appraised of the activities of each unit. 

E. D. Merrill, Chairman. 




A section of the peony and rhododendron garden of Cherry 
Mill Nurseries at the June Show, 1942. 

Report of the Committee on Prizes 

I am glad to report that the prize committee worked together 
well during the past year, the judging proving very enjoyable to 
all. We had excellent co-operation from the exhibitors, the direc- 
tor of exhibitions and his staff. 

Your committee on prizes has judged on 10 shows during the 
past year. 

At our first business meeting of the year, Mr. Webster empha- 
sized the fact that judges should keep in mind that they were 
judging a flower exhibit rather than a garden or established plant- 
ing. In connection with this suggestion your committee recom- 
mends that a new scale be devised for judging garden exhibits 
with dramatic appeal. By using the present scale of points, Mr. 



ANNUAL MEETING, 1943 



57 



Eddy's garden did not score as high as it should considering the 
appeal it made to the public. 

Following the vote of the Trustees, no medals of our Society 
were awarded this year. Medal certificates took their place. The 
Horticultural Society of New York and The Pennsylvania Horti- 
cultural Society, although they, too, withdrew their medals after 




The window exhibit of Garden-in-the-W oods at 
the Spring Show, 1943. 

the Spring flower show schedule had been printed, co-operated by 
substituting gold medal certificates. 

Your committee recommends to the Trustees that any recipient 
of a gold, silver or bronze certificate, who has not previously won 
such medals, be entitled to exchange the certificate for a medal 
when, as, and if the time shall come that conservation of metal 
is no longer required. 

Your committee has scaled all groups and co-operated with the 
exhibition committee, meeting with them at the time of the Spring 
flower show. 

The Totty Memorial Medal was awarded this year for the first 
time by your Society at the Spring flower show, going to Albert 
A. Hully for his rose garden. Arthur Herrington, a member of 
the Totty Memorial Medal Committee, assisted us in awarding the 



58 ^lASSACHUSETTS HORTICULTURAL SOCIETY 

medal. He was much pleased with the award because he felt that 
it was given to the kind of a garden in which Mr. Totty was 
especiall}^ interested. 

The President's Cup was awarded to L. Sherman Adams, who 
did much to assemble an exhibition of orchids which was con- 
sidered by many of those members of the American Orchid Society 
present, as the finest exhibition of orchids ever displayed in North 
America. 

The New York Gold Medal certificate was awarded to Alex- 
ander Irving Heimlich for his rock garden and waterfall, and the 
Pennsylvania Gold Medal certificate to Albert A. Hulley for his 
outstanding rose garden. Will C. Curtis received the Bulkley 
Medal in bronze, awarded by the Garden Club of America for his 
interesting and educational exhibit of rare and unusual plants 
gathered from all parts of the country. The award for the best 
commercial exhibit in the show offered by the State Department 
of Agriculture went to Ernest Borowski for an azalea garden. 

Aubrey Butler, Chairman. 

Report of the Committee on the Exhibition of the 
Products of Children's Gardens 

The victory garden movement which was not taken too seriously 
by adults in Massachusetts a year ago was stimulated the past 
year through interest shown by school authorities and civic or- 
ganizations, such as the Kiwanis and Rotary Clubs. As a result 
more school and home gardens were cultivated by the children 
than in any year since the first world war. Due credit for this 
splendid effort should be given to the garden teachers and school 
garden supervisors. 

The increased number of gardens of course had a tremendous 
influence on the 1942 exhibition of the products of children's 
gardens. According to Daniel W. O'Brien, assistant director of 
gardening and vocational agriculture for the Boston schools and 
a member of this committee, the 1942 children's show was the 
finest ever held in this country both in quality and excellence of 
products shown. It ranked well, Mr. O'Brien thinks, with many 
of the adult garden exhibitions held last year. 

There were 1298 individual entries, an increase of 507 over the 
1941 show. In addition, there were 590 entries in the 4-H Club 
section, making a total of 1888 entries in the entire show. The 
quality of the vegetables and flowers was extremely good and the 
work of proper supervision was evident because large specimens 
were conspicuous by their absence. The children were taught that 



ANNUAL MEETING, 1943 



59 



a medium-sized uniform vegetable was much more likely to win 
a prize. 

The majority of first prizes were awarded to children of Boston 
who had home gardens or who had a plot in a Boston school 
garden. The first prize for the best school garden exhibit was 
also awarded to a Boston school. The exhibits included both 
flowers and vegetables. The focal point in one of the school garden 
exhibits was a basket of zinnias which was considered by experts 
to be one of the finest arrangements of zinnias ever exhibited at 
Horticultural Hall. There were other interesting exhibits of 
flowers because the children had been encouraged to grow a few 
flowers around their vegetable plots to make them more interest- 
ing and attractive. Classes for these flowers had of course been 
arranged in the schedule. In the class for a mixed bouquet there 




A section of L. Sherman Adams' remarkable orchid exhibit 
which won the President's Cup at the Spring Show, 1943. 

were 45 entries, and for a vase of marigolds there were over 30 
entries. 

The weather during the show was very favorable and the 
attendance much larger than in former years. However, some- 
thing should be done to encourage more adults to visit the show. 
This would not only give people a much better idea about the 
wonderful work the children do in our home and school gardens, 
but it would also stimulate the children to work even harder. 



60 



MASSACHUSETTS HORTICULTURAL SOCIETY 



]\Iay I urge the members of the Society, especialh^ the trustees, 
to visit the children's show this year. The dates are August 26 
and 27. 

In conclusion, I want to thank Daniel O'Brien and his assistant 
Henrj^ G. Wendler for looking after the details in planning and 
staging the show so carefully and efficiently. A Avord of apprecia- 
tion should also go to the Boston School Committee for the assist- 
ance they gave the children through regularly appointed garden 

supervisors. c^ t /-. r^i ■ 

Samuel J. Goddard, Chairman. 

Result of the Balloting 

At four o'clock the polls were closed, 60 votes having been cast, 
and the following were declared elected : 

President: Edwin S. Webster 
Vice-President: Charles K. Cummings 
Trustees: George W. Butterworth 

WiNTHROP L. Carter 

Dr. George 0. Clark 

Mrs. John Gardner Coolidge 

Mrs. S. V. R. Crosby 

Walter Hunnewell 




The circle at the Quincy end of the Fore River bridge for 

which the City of Quincy was awarded the Society's Blue 

Ribbon Certificate in 1942. 



Massachusetts Horticultural Society 

HONORARY MEMBERS 

1942 Lord Aberconway, North Wales, England 

1942 F. A. Bartlett, Stamford, Connecticut 

1942 Wat.ter D. Brownell, Little Conipton, Rhode Island 

1942 Alex Gumming, Bristol, Connecticut 

1942 Dr. Willtam A. Dayton, Washington, District of Columbia 

1942 A. T. De La Mare, New York, New York 

1942 David Fairchild, Coconut Grove, Florida 

1942 Joseph B. Gabi^e, Stewartstown, Pennsylvania 

1942 Arthur Hkrrington, New York, New York 

1942 Henry Hicks, Westbury, Long Island, New York 

1942 Fred H. Howard, Montebello, California 

1942 August Koch, Chicago, Illinois 

1942 Colonel R. H. Montgomery, Coconut Grove, Florida 

1942 Rop.ert Moses, New York, New York 

1942 G. G. Nearing, Ridgewood, New Jersey 

1942 Frederick Law Olmsted, Brookline, Massachusetts 

1942 George H. Pring, St. Louis, Missouri 

1942 Dk. Alfred Rehder, Jamaica Plain, Massachusetts 

1942 Dr. a. B. Stout, New York, New York 

1942 NoR]MAN Taylor, New York, New York 

1942 Dr. William A. Taylor, Washington, District of Columbia 

1942 C. J. Van Bourgondien, Babylon, Long Island, New York 

1942 Dr. Frank A. Waugh, Amherst, Massachusetts 

1942 Richard Wellington, Geneva, New York 

1942 Elizabeth C. AVhite, Whitesbog, New Jersey 

1943 Albert C. Burrage, Jr., Boston, Massachusetts 

1943 Vincent R. DePetris, Grosse Pointe Farms, Michigan 

1943 Jens Jensen, Ellison Bay, Wisconsin. 

1943 Henry T. Skinner, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 

CORRESPONDING MEMBERS 

1925 Rudolph D. Anstead, Bournemouth, England. 

1889 Dr. L. H. Bailey, Ithaca, New York 

61 



62 MASSACHUSETTS HORTICULTURAL SOCIETY 

1925 F. R. S. Balfour, F.L.S., B&wjek, Stobo, Tweeddale, Scotland 

1911 W. J. Bean, 2, Mortlake Road, Kew, England 

1918 Desire Bois, Paris, France 

1925 I. H. Burkill, F.L.S., ''Clova," Fetcham Park, Leatherhead, 
Surrey, England 

1921 Fred J. CHirrEXDEN, Royal Horticultural Society, Vincent Square, 
Westminster, London, England 

1925 Woox Young Chun, Sun Yat Sen University, Canton, China 

1925 G. W. Darnell-Smith, Director of the Sydney Botanic Gardens, 
Sydney, New South Wales 

1925 Henry F. duPont, Winterthur, Delaware 

1925 Pierre S. duPont, Wilmington, Delaware 

1925 Charles C. Eley, M.A., F.L.S., Suffolk, England. 

1925 G. Eraser, Ucuelet, Vancouver Island, British Columbia. 

1925 W. G. Freeman, B.S.C, F.L.S., Imperial Institute, South 
Kensington, London S.W.7. England. 

1918 Professor N. E. Hansen, Brookings, South Dakota. 

1911 Professor U. P. Hedrick, Geneva, New York. 

1925 Professor H. H. Hu, Fan Memorial Institute of Biolog>', Peking. 
China. 

1925 Mrs. C. L. Hutchinson, Lake Geneva, Wisconsin. 

1925 Ch.\rles W. Knight, Oakdale, New York. 

1921 C. E. Lane-Poole, Canberra, Australia. 

1925 C. C. Laney, Rochester, N. Y. 

1911 M. Emile Lemoine, Nancy, France. 

1925 Sir J. S. Maxwell, Bart, K.T., Pollok House, near Glasgow, 
Scotland. 

1918 J. Horace McFarland, Harrisburg, Pennsylvania. 

1925 Mrs. William Mercer, Doylestown, Pennsylvania. 

1925 Dr. Kingo Miyabe, Imperial University, Sapparo, Japan. 

1898 Sir Frederick W. Moore, F.L.S., Willbrook House, Rathfarnham 
Co.. Dublin, Ireland. 

1918 Dr. George T. Moore, Botanical Gardens, St. Louis, Missouri. 

1925 F. Cleveland Morgan, Montreal, Canada. 

1925 M. L, Parde, Nogent-sur-Vernisson (Loiret), France. 

1925 I. B. Pole-Evans, C.M.G., Chief of Division and Director, Botani- 
cal Survey, Pretoria, Transvaal, South Africa. 

1906 Lt.-Col. Sir David Prain, C.M.G., F.R.S., F.L.S., Warlingham, 
Surrey, England. 

1925 Miss Isabell.^ Preston, Ottawa, Canada. 

1925 Johannes Rafn, Skovfrokontoret, Copenhagen, Denmark. 



MASSACHUSETTS HORTICULTURAL SOCIETY 63 

1906 Dr. Henry N. Ridley, C.M.G., F.R.S., F.L.S., M.A., Kew, Surrey, 

England. 
1925 Camillo Schneider, c/o Gartenschonheit, Berlin- Westend, 

Germany. 
1925 F. L. Skinner, Dropmore, Manitoba. 
1925 Sir William Wright Smith, F.L.S., Royal Botanic Garden, 

Edinburgh, Scotland. 
1893 Professor William Trelease, Urbana, Illinois. 
1918 F. GOMER Waterer, Knaphill, Surrey, England. 

1925 Cyril T. White, Government Botanist, Brisbane, Queensland, 

Australia. 
1921 Gurney Wilson, Secretary Royal Horticultural Society Orchid 

Committee, Vincent Square, London S.W.I, England. 
1925 John C. Wister, Germantown, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. 
1925 Major A. C. T. Woodward, Bewdley, Worcestershire, England. 



Bequests to the Massachusetts 
Horticultural Society 

It is hoped by the Massachusetts Horticultural Society that it 
will not be forgotten by members who find it expedient to make 
their wills. This Society's financial condition is sound and its 
investments are good, but the income from many of its invest- 
ments has declined because of decreased returns from its bond 
holdings. Expenses naturally have increased and more money is 
needed to extend the activities of the Society. 

The following form of bequest is suggested : 

FORM OF BEQUEST 



I give and bequeath to the IMassachusetts Horticultural Society 

located in Boston, Massachusetts, the sum of 

to be used as the Board of Trustees may 

direct for the promotion of horticulture in its various forms and 
for extending the activities of the Society along educational lines. 

Signed 



1944 

YEAR BOOK 

OF THE 

MASSACHUSETTS HORTICULTURAL 

SOCIETY 



Foreword 



The Committee on Lectures and Publications has 
the honor to present herewith the twenty-first number 
of the Society's Year Book, with which is combined 
the annual reports for the year 1943. 

Elmer D. Merrill, Chairman. 
Boston, Mass. 
Mav 1, 1944. 




John S. Ames 
Elected president at the annual meeting, May 1, 1944. 



Table of Contents 

Foreword 1 

Officers for 1944 5 

Committees for 1944 7 

Medals and Certificates Awarded in 1943 9 

Recipients of Special Medal Awards in 1943 16 

Scroll Presented Mr. Webster 21 

The New George Holliday Prize 21 

Albert C. Burrage Award 21 

Books Added to the Library 23 

Gifts to the Library 20 

Book Award for 1943 30 

Benevolent Fraternity Fruit and Flower Mission 31 

Annual Meeting, 1944 35 

Presentations 35 

The President's Address 36 

Report of the Secretary 39 

Report of the Treasurer 42 

Report of the Library Committee 44 

Report of the Committee on Exhibitions 45 

Report of the Committee on Prizes 47 

Report of the Committee on the Exhibition of the Products 

of Children's Gardens 48 

Result of the Balloting 49 

Board of Trustees 50 

Necrology 52 

Honorary Members 53 

Corresponding Members 53 




Dr. George 0. Clark 
Elected vice-president at the annual meeting, May 1, 1944. 



THE BOARD OF GOVERNMENT 

OF THE 

MASSACHUSETTS HORTICULTURAL 
SOCIETY 

President 
JOHN S. AMES 

Vice-Presidents 

Charles K. CtJMMiNGs 
Dr. George 0. Clark 

Trustees 

*JoHN S. Ambs * Walter Hunnewell 
Aubrey B. Butler (1945) Harlan P. Kelsey (1945) 

George W. Butterworth (1946) George Lewis, Jr. (1946) 

*George 0. Clark Dunbar Lockwood (1945) 

Mrs. John Gardner Coolidge (1946) Q. A. Shaw McKean (1946) 
Mrs. S. V. R. Crosby (1946) Elmer D. Merrill (1947) 

•Charles K. Cummings Harold S. Ross (1947) 

Paul W. Dempsey (1947) Fletcher Steele (1945) 

Samuel J. Goddard (1947) Mrs. Roger S. Warner (1945) 

Ernest Hoftyzer (1947) * Edwin S. Webster 

Honorary Trustees 

Oakes Ames 
Miss Marian Roby Case 

Treasurer 

Walter Hunnewell 

Secretary 
Edward I. Farrington 

^Members ex-offlcio. Dates given are those of expiration of terms. 





Q. A. Shaw McKean 



Ernest Hoftyzer 






Paul W. Dempsey 



George Lewis, Jr. 



NEWLY ELECTED TRUSTEES 



COMMITTEES OF THE SOCIETY 
For the Year Ending May 7, 1945 

Executive Committee 

JOHN S. AMES, Chairman 
DR. GEORGE O. CLARK WALTER HUNNEWELL 

CHARLES K. CUMMINGS EDWIN S. WEBSTER 

Finance Committee 

JOHN S. AMES, Chairman 

WALTER HUNNEWELL EDWIN S. WEBSTER 

Budget Committee 

JOHN S. AMES, Chairman 

DR. GEORGE O. CLARK WALTER HUNNEWELL 

CHARLES K. CUMMINGS EDWIN S. WEBSTER 

Meml)ersliip Committee 

GEORGE W. BUTTERWORTH, Chairman 

PAUL W. DEMPSEY ERNEST HOFTYZER 

Committee on Exhibitions 

ELMER D. MERRILL, Chairman 

SAMUEL J. GODDARD FRANK W. SELLNER 

ALLEN W. HIXON MRS. IRVING C. WRIGHT 

Committee on Prizes 

AUBREY B. BUTLER, Chairman 

ERNEST BOROWSKI SYDNEY G. KIMPTON 

DR. GEORGE O. CLARK HAROLD E. WHITE 

Committee on Library 

CHARLES K. CUMMINGS, Chairman 

MRS. S. V. R. CROSBY ELMER D. MERRILL 

MRS. SUSAN McKELVEY MRS. ROGER S. WARNER 

Committee on Lectures and Publications 

ELMER D. MERRILL, Chairman 

MRS. JOHN G. COOLIDGE ERNEST HOFTYZER 

Committee on Special Medals 

HAROLD S. ROSS, Chairman 

AUBREY B. BUTLER HARLAN P. KELSEY 

PAUL DEMPSEY FLETCHER STEELE 

Committee on Gardens 

FLETCHER STEELE, Chairman 

GEORGE W. BUTTERWORTH CHARLES P. GORELY, JR. 

DUNBAR LOCKWOOD HAROLD S. ROSS 

Committee on Building 

JOHN S. AMES, Chairman 

CHARLES K. CUMMINGS . Q. A. SHAW McKEAN 

Committee on Children's Gardens Exhibitions 

SAMUEL J. GODDARD, Chairman 

DANIEL W. O'BRIEN MRS. HENRY D. TUDOR 

Committee on the Albert C. Burrage Gold Vase 

WALTER HUNNEWELL, Chairman 

ALBERT C. BURRAGE, JR. MRS. JOHN G. COOLIDGE 

AUBREY B. BUTLER ELMER D. MERRILL 

Nominating Committee 
GEORGE W. BUTTERWORTH MRS. S. V. R. CROSBY 

MRS. JOHN G. COOLIDGE GEORGE LEWIS, JR. 

Q. A. SHAW McKEAN 




Victory demonstration garden on Boston Common. This Society 
had an important part in developing this garden. 



Medals and Certificates Awarded 

in 1943 

The Albert C. Burr age Gold Vase 
L. Sherman Adams, for the most outstanding exhibit in 1943. 

George Robert White Medal of Honor 
Richardson Wright, for eminent service in horticulture. 

Thomas Roland Medal 
E. O. Orpet, widely known nurseryman growing rare and unusual plants 
with great skill. 

Jackson Dawson Memorial Medal 

Wilfrid Wheeler, for his work in hybridizing and propagating hollies, and 
poi)iilari/ing the ])(*ach i)lum. 

President's Cup 
L. Sherman Adams CoTinpany, for a grouj) of orchids at tlie Spring show. 

Gold Medal Certificate of the Horticultural Society of New York 

Alexander Irving llcimlicli, for a waterfall and rock garden at the Spring 
show. 

Gold Medal Certificate of the Pennsylvania Horticultural Society 
Albert A. Hulley, for a rose garden at the Spring show. 

Charles H. Totty Memorial Medal 

Albert A. Hulley, for a rose garden at the Sj)iing show. 

Beacon Hill Garden Club Cup 

North Shore Garden Club, for plants in a window. 

Prize of the Massachusetts Department of Agriculture 

Needhani Floral Company, for an azalea garden at the Spring show. 

Sarah Todd Bulkley Bronze Medal of the Garden Club of America 

Garden-in-the-Woods, for new, rare, and unusual plants at the Spring 
show. 

Crystal Vases 

Breck's, for the daffodil, Carlton, best bloom in the show. 

John Russell, for the tulip. Pride of Zwanenburg, best l)loom in the show. 

Book: "This Green World" 
Roceo Zeparo, for the camellia Monarch, best bloom in the show. 

9 



10 MASSACHUSETTS HORTICULTITJAL SOCIETY 

Gold Medal Certificates 

L. Sherman Adams Company, for a gi-oup of cymbidiums at the Spring 

show. 4 
L. Sherman Adams Company, for a group of eypripediums at the Spring 

show. 
L. Sherman Adams Company, for a group of orchids at the Spring show. 
L. Sherman Adams Company, for a group of orchids. 
Associated Flower AiTangers of Massachusetts, Mrs. Arthur P. Teele, 

Director, for a composite display of flower arrangements. 
Mrs. E. D. Brandegee, for a gi-oup of chrysanthemums. 
A, J. Carpenter, for a collection of butterflies and moths. 
Champlain View Gardens, for a display of gladioli. 
Chen-y Hill Nurseries, for peony displays. 

Mrs. Ernest B. Dane, for a gi'oup of orchids at the Spring show. 
Sherman W. Eddy, for a New England house and garden at the Spring 

show. 
Merritt L. Fernald and Prof. Alfred C. Ivinsey, for the book "Edible 

Wild Plants of Eastern North America." 
Garden-in-the- Woods, for a display of perennials. 
Alexander Irving Heimlich, for a waterfall and rock garden at the Spring 

show. 
Albert A. Hulley, for a rose garden at the Spring show. 
Members of the American Orchid Society, for a gi'oup of orchids at the 

Spring show. 
Needham Floral Company, for a gi'oup of azaleas. 
Perry Seed Company, for a display of vegetables. 
Seabrook Nurseries, for a display of gladioli. 
Mrs. Galen L. Stone, for a gi'oup of acacias at the Spring show. 
William T. Walke & Sons, Inc., for a group of amaryllis at the Spring 

show. 
Edwin S. Webster, for a gi-oup of orchids at the Spring show. 
Weston Nurseries, Inc., for an informal garden at the Spring show. 

Silver Medal Certificates 

Breck's, for a display of tulips. 

George W. Butterworth, for an artistic aiTaugement of orchids. 

Cherry Hill Nurseries, for an informal garden at the Spring show. 

Dr. George 0. Clark, for a display of Dixi blueberries. 

Dr. George 0. Clark, for a display of delphiniums (Clark's Specials). 

Colprit's Nursery and Seed Farm, for a display of fruits, flowei*s and 

vegetables. 
J. F. Cummings, for a display of vegetables. 

Mrs. Ernest B. Dane, for a group of eypripediums at the Spring show. 
The Downs Estate, for a gi-oup of cjaubidiums at the Spring show. 
Eugene N. Fischer, for an educational exhibit showing the evolution of 

the gladiolus. 
Ford Motor Company, for a display of soybeans and their uses. 



MEDALS AND CERTIFICATES AWARDED IN 1943 11 

Gardner Museum, for Cymbidium pauwelsi at the Spring show. 

George Peabody Gardner, Jr., for a display of camellias. 

Thomas J. Grey Company, for a display of vegetables. 

Harvard University Botanic Garden, for a collection of sempervivums. 

Alexander Irving Heimlich, for a display of snapdragons at the Spring 

show. 
Needham Floral Company, for an azalea garden at the Spring show. 
Thomas Roland, Inc., for a group of cypripediums at the Spring show. 
John Russell, for a Spring border of hyacinths. 
John Truesdale, for a display of sweet peas. 
University of New Hampshire, for new vegetable varieties. 
Edwin S. Webster, for a gi'oup of orchids. 
Weymouth High School, for a collection of Victory garden posters. 

Bronze Medal Certificates 

Arnold Arboretum, for broad-leaved evergreens uninjured last Winter. 

Breck's, for a display of baby gladioli and English irises. 

Breck's, for a display of salad vegetables. 

J. R. Cass, for an educational display showing methods of lily propaga- 
tion. 

W. N. Craig, for a display of perennials. 

Kenneth Houghton, for a display of Shasta daisies. 

David Keizer, for a collection of vegetables. 

Lookout Farm, for a collection of vegetables and flowers. 

Men's Garden Club of Whitman, for a display of hardy chrysanthemums. 

John D. Runkle School, for a model of a Victory garden at the Spring 
show. 

First Class Certificates 

Blueberry Dixi, exhibited by Dr. George 0. Clark. 

Brassocattleya Surya, exhibited by L. Sherman Adams Company. 

Brassolaeliocattleya cliftoni Sir John French, exhibited by Edwin S. 
Webster. 

Camellia semi-double blush, exhibited by Dr. George O. Clark. 

Clematis Blue Star, exhibited by Louis Vasseur. 

Daphne odora, exhibited by Ernest Borowski. 

Epiphyllum (Phyllocactus) General Wainwright, exhibited by Louis 
Vasseur. 

Epiphyllum (Phj^llocactus) Guadalcanal, exhibited by Louis Vasseur. 

Epiphyllum (Phyllocactus) Longissimus Superbus, exhibited by Louis 
Vasseur. 

Epiphyllum (Phyllocactus) Victor Hugo, exhibited by Louis Vasseur. 

Laelioeattleya Alma, exhibited by Edwin S. Webster. 

Laeliocattleya britannia var. alba, exhibited by L. Sherman Adams Com- 
pany. 

Lilium elegans robustum x Alice Wilson xx L. .elegans aurantiacum, 
exhibited by Louis Vasseur. 

Lilium umbellatum Apricot x L. elegans aurantiacum xx Alice Wilson, 
exhibited bv Louis Vasseur. 



12 MASSACHUSETTS HORTICULTURAL SOCIETY 

Lilium umbellatmn Apricot x Orange King, exhibited by Louis Vasseur. 

Paeonia inlokosewitzki, exhibited by Louis Vasseur. 

Rhododendron hybrid (R. griersonianum x R. fortunei), exhibited by 

Ernest Borowski. 
New double pink snapdragon, Arno Nehrling, exhibited by C. H. Lothrop. 

Awards of Merit 

Brassocattleya Caronis, exhibited by L. Sherman Adams Company. 

Brassocattleya cliftoni var. Magnifica, exhibited by The Downs Estate. 

Brassocattleya Princess Patricia, exhibited by Mrs. Ernest B. Dane. 

Brassocattleya Seafoam var. Glacier, exhibited by Edwin S. Webster. 

Brassocattleya Speciosa, exhibited b}' John Mutch. 

Brassocattleya Speciosa, exhibited by Edwin S. Webster. 

Brassolaeliocattleya Daffora, exhibited bj' L. Sherman Adams Company. 

Brassolaelioeattleya Yellow Hammer, exhibited by L. Sherman Adams 
Company. 

Brassolaeliocattleya Xanthedo, exhibited by L. Sherman Adams Company. 

Carnation Miller's Yellow, exhibited by Miller's Greenhouses. 

Carnation Sally, exhibited by Kellen Bros. 

New white carnation Casablanca, exhibited by Baur & Steinkamp. 

Cattleya Edithiae, exhibited b}' Mrs. Ernest B. Dane. 

Cattleya Tityus x Brassolaeliocattleya Jupiter, exhibited by The Downs 
Estate. 

Clematis Mme. Charles Vasseur (C. lanuginosa), exhibited by Louis 
Vasseur. 

Clematis patens x C. montano undulata-alba, exhibited by Louis Vasseur. 

Cymbidium Andromeda, exhibited by L. Sherman Adams Company. 

Cymbidium Gosoon, exhibited by Mrs. Ernest B. Dane. 

Cymbidium Jason var. Golden Beauty, exhibited by Edwin S. Webster. 

Cymbidium Pharos var. Paragon, exhibited by John S. Ames. 

Cymbidium titrianae var. Old Dog Kennel, exhibited by Edwin S. Web- 
ster. 

Cypripedium Aboyne, exhibited by Mrs. Ernest B. Dane. 

Cypripedium Amaze, exhibited by Edwin S. Webster. 

Cypripedium Balaclava, exhibited by L, Sherman Adams Company. 

Cypripedium D. Clarke, exhibited by L. Sherman Adams Company. 

Cypripedium Emmer Green, exhibited by Mrs. Ernest B. Dane. 

Cypripedium Grace Darling, Lawnacres var., exhibited by L. Sherman 
Adams Company. 

Cypripedium Phulbiades, exhibited by John S. Ames. 

Cypripedium Sumurum, exhibited by Thomas Roland, Inc. 

Gladiolus Connecticut Yankee, exhibited by William Schenetsky. 

Yellow Gladiolus Spotlight, exhibited by Champlain View Gardens. 

Laeliocattleya Blendia, exhibited by L. Sherman Adams Company. 

Laeliocattleya Derna, .exhibited by L. Sherman Adams Company. 

Laeliocattleya Snowdrift, exhibited by George W. Butterworth. 

Oak Leaf lettuce, exhibited by Harold S. Ross. 

Lilium elegans alut^ceum x Alice WQson, exhibited by Louis Vasseur. 



MEDALS AND CERTIFICATES AWARDED IN 1943 13 

Lilium elegans aurantiacum x Alice Wilson xx Leonard Joerg, exhibited 

by Louis Vasseur. 
Lilium regale seedling, exhibited by S. J. Goddard. 
Lilium umbellatum Refulgence x Erectum xx Apricot, exhibited by Louis 

Vasseur. 
White Lilium regale seedling, exhibited by S. J. Goddard. 
Collection of seedling peonies, exhibited by Cherry Hill Nurseries. 
New Single peony Ken Henderson, exhibited by Louis Vasseur. 
New shell bean Flash, exhibited by Prof. J. R. Hepler. 
New sweet pepper Merrimac Wonder, exhibited by Prof. J. R. Hepler. 
Rose Golden Harvest, exhibited by Joseph H. Hill Company. 
Rose Tangerine, exhibited by Joseph H. Hill Company. 
Rose Vanity Fair, exhibited by Totty's. 
Vanda coerulea, exhibited by L. Sherman Adams Company. 

Votes of Commendation 

Gladiolus Payday, exhibited by Sunnyside Gladiolus Gardens. 

Lily seedlings, exhibited by Miss Norma E. Pfeiffer. 

Oncidium Wellesley (Seedling Oncidium varicosum var. rogersi x 0. 

Comtesse de Briton), exhibited by L. Sherman Adams Company. 
Peony Lady Pepperell, exhibited by Charles Edmondson. 
Peony seedlings, exhibited by Mrs. Beatrice Haddrell. 
Carnation Rose Caress, U. S. D. A. Seedling No. 1, exhibited by Davis 

Bros. 
New shell bean Brilliant, exhibited by Prof. J. R. Hepler. 
New tomato Orange King, exhibited by Dr. Albert F. Yeager. 
New watermelon White Mountain, exhibited by Dr. Albert F. Yeager 

Cultural Certificates 

Peter Arnott, for Brassocattleya Haine Hunter. 

Peter Arnott, for Dendrobium Merlin. 

Peter Arnott, for Dendrobium Virginale. 

Peter Arnott, for Lachenalia. 

George W. Butterworth, for Cypripedium venustum. 

R. G. Chamberlain, for Cymbidium Ceres. 

R. G. Chamberlain, for Vanda rothschildiana. 

Champlain View Gardens, for a display of gladioli. 

Cherry Hill Nurseries, for a group of rhododendrons. 

Dr. George 0. Clark, for clematis. 

Dr. George 0. Clark, for a display of delphiniums (Clark's Specials). 

Will C. Curtis, for new, rare and unusual plants. 

Vincent DePetris, for a display of new chrysanthemums. 

Harry Eaton, for a group of cymbidiums. 

Harry Eaton, for Zygopetalum mackayi. 

George Peabody Gardner, Jr., for a specimen cyclamen plant. 

E. J. Hannington, for Cypripedium maudiae. 

E. J. Hannington, for Dendrobium thwaitesiae, Vietch's var. 

George Hewitt, for a group of chrysanthemums. 



14 MASSACHUSETTS HORTICULTURAL SOCIETY 

James Hurley, for a gi*oup of orchids. 

Edgar L. Kline, for a display of Lilium auratum seedlings. 

C. H. Lothrop, for original Lothrop double snapdragon and sports. 

Needham Floral Company, for a group of azaleas. 

Needham Floral Company, for Rhododendron mucronatum (Azalea ledi- 

folia alba.) 
George Palmer, for fuchsia plants. 
John Sullivan, for Cymbidium pauwelsii. 
John Truesdale, for a display of sweet peas. 
Rocco Zeparo, for a collection of camellias. 

Vote of Thanks 

Arnold Arboretum, for broad-leaved evergreens uninjured in the previous 
Winter. 

Baur & Steinkamp, for seedling chrjsanthemums. 

Mrs. E. D. Brandegee, for nerines. 

James R. Cass, for Louisiana wild iris. 

Dr. George 0. Clark, for Clematis heracleaefolia. 

W. N. Craig, for specimen epidendrums. 

Mrs. S. V, Crosby, for various irises. 

Mrs. S. V. R. Crosby, for Russell lupines. 

Mrs. S. V. R. Crosby, for varieties of sweet peas. 

Miss Helen M. Fox, for a collection of lilies. 

Mrs. H. K. Gardiner, for peony Festiva Maxima. 

Mrs. H. K, Gardiner, for peony Jeannette. 

Thomas J. Grey Company, for a display of chrysanthemums. 

Mrs. Ralph S. Megathlin, for a vase of Christmas roses. 

North Shore Garden Club, for Christmas decorations. 

Sandyloam (Alan and Esther Macneil), for Lilium candidum and del- 
phiniums. 

Mrs. George H. Sherwin, for a collection of hardy chrysanthemums. 

Mrs. Peter L. Smith, for an amaryllis plant at the Spring show. 

Louis Vasseur, for tuberous rooted begonias. 

AVayside Gardens, for the chrysanthemum Mme. Chiang Kai-Shek. 




Flower arrangement exhibit of the Beacon Hill Garden Club 
at the Spring show, 1944. 




Chinese Garden set up by Frost & Higgins at the Spring 
show, 1944, and awarded a gold medal. 



Recipients of the Medals Awarded 

on Recommendation of the 

Special Medals Committee 



Richardson Wright 

Mr. Richardson Wright, who was awarded the George Robert 
White Medal of Honor by the trustees of the Massachusetts Horti- 




Presentation of the George Robert White Medal of Honor to 
Richardson Wright at the annual meeting, 1944, the presentation 
speech being made by the retiring president, Edwin S. Webster. 



cultural Society in 1944, has long been active in many fields of 
horticulture and has done much to raise the standards of gar- 
dening in this country as well as to arouse greater interest in hor- 
ticultural pursuits. He has been editor of "House and Garden" 
for 30 years, has traveled widely, has lectured in many cities 

16 



RECIPIENTS OF SPECIAL MEDALS 17 

throughout the country, has filled important offices in several 
societies and has written many books. 

Mr. Wright was born in Philadelphia, Pa., and was educated 
at the Episcopal Academy and Trinity College. He was Sunday 
editor of the Knickerbocker Press, Albany, N. Y., in 1910. Then 
he went to Siberia and Manchuria as a correspondent for an 
American newspaper. 

Returning, he was for a short time literary critic of the "New 
York Times." In June, 1914, he became editor of "House and 
Garden," holding that position ever since. He is chairman of the 
Horticultural Society of New York, chairman of the International 
Flower Show, a trustee of Trinity College, a trustee of the New 
York Botanical Garden and president of the Wine and Food 
Society. He has been president of the Men's Garden Club of New 
York and the American Rose Society. Mr. Wright was awarded 
the gold medal of the American Iris Society in 1937 and the 
Arthur Hoyt Scott garden award in 1942. He has a country 
place at Silvermine, Norwalk, Conn., where he specializes in the 
growing of roses, daffodils, lilacs and day lilies. 



E. 0. Orpet 

Mr. Edward Owen Orpet, awarded the Thomas Roland Medal in 
1943, was born in Cirencester, Gloucestershire, England, Febru- 
ary 11, 1863, and apprenticed at 14 at Lockerly Hall, Hampshire. 
He finished his course and went to the Duke of Sutherland's 
gardens at Trentham, where he qualified for a transfer as fore- 
man to the famous gardens at Headfort House in Ireland. He left 
there in 1887 and came to New Jersey to care for a nursery of 
perennials. After three years he took charge of E. V. R. Thayer's 
estate in Lancaster, Mass., and it was there that he worked with 
and developed his best loved plant, the orchid. 

His work with orchids was recognized by the award of many 
medals from the Massachusetts Horticultural Society, the Worces- 
ter County Horticultural Society and the Horticultural Society 
of New York covering a period of ten years from 1900. In those 
days species of laelias and cattleyas were the only sources for 
parents, but he originated many valuable kinds which have since 
been used for cut flowers. Also during this period he originated 
the bi-generic hybrid, Epicattleya orpetiana, named for him. 

After twenty years in Massachusetts, Mr. Orpet was superin- 
tendent of Walden, the Lake Forest estate of Cyrus H. Mc- 
Cormick where his work was largely construction and super- 



18 



MASSACHUSETTS HORTICULTURAL SOCIETY 




Edward 0. Orpet 

Awarded the 

Thomas Roland Medal 

in 1943 



vision of "all outdoors." While here he won in two successive 
years the Vaughan medal for collections of perennials. 

He contributed "his bit" to the war effort by doing the propa- 
gation of newly introduced experimental plants at the U. S. De- 
partment of Agriculture Station in Chico, Calif. From there he 
went to Santa Barbara where he found the park system in the 



Wilfrid Wheeler 

Awarded the 

Jackson Dawson Memorial Medal 

in 1943 




RECIPIENTS OP SPECIAL MEDALS 19 

course of construction. For the ensuing ten years as superin- 
tendent of parks he superintended their development, adorning 
them with exotics which long experience had taught him could 
survive and become naturalized there. As he was also experi- 
menting at home he found that he unwittingly had made a nurs- 
ery of his home grounds, so resigned from public work to continue 
the propagation and distribution of rare plants. 

Mr. Orpet has passed his 81st birthday, but still maintains his 
keen interest and is active daily in his nursery. This means 67 years 
of unremitting work in his chosen field in many branches with 
a record of not one whole week of unemployment. 



Wilfrid Wheeler 

Mr. Wilfrid Wheeler, who was awarded the Jackson Dawson 
Memorial Medal in 1943, has long been a prominent figure in 
New England horticulture. He was born and brought up on the 
old homestead in Concord, Mass., where members of the Wheeler 
family have long been active. He attended Brown University, 
Harvard University and the Bussey Institution. Later he traveled 
in England and France, paying particular attention to horti-, 
cultural developments in those countries. He operated the family 
farm in Concord from 1898 to 1920. He became secretary of the 
State Board of Agriculture with headquarters at the State House 
in Boston in 1912, holding that position until 1918, when he became 
the state's first commissioner of agriculture, which position he 
held for two years. After that, he moved to Cape Cod, establish- 
ing himself at Hatchville, a part of Falmouth. 

He has done much to develop horticulture on the Cape, includ- 
ing the commercial growing of strawberries and melons. He 
developed particular interest in hollies in 1925, when he found 
that they were being ruthlessly destroyed in the Cape section. At 
that time he began to collect and propagate them and has been 
highly successful in this work. 

Mr. Wheeler has also become interested in the beach plum, 
which is widely distributed throughout the Cape, and has been 
collecting and propagating plants in an endeavor to preserve the 
best strains. In 1943 he received the Jewett prize for beach plum 
improvement. He has been consulted as a horticultural expert 
on Marthas Vineyard as well as on the Cape and has devoted much 
time to the preservation of wild flowers, being an active member 
of the New England Wild Flower Society. 



Scroll Presented Mr. Webster 

The illuminated scroll presented Mr. Edwin S. Webster at the 
annual meeting of the society on May 1, 1944, reads as follows: 
*'he whom we delight to honor'' 
THE MASSACHUSETTS HORTICULTURAL SOCIETY 

Honors You 

Edwin S. Webster 

as its President for twelve years, a longer period than that in which 

any other president has served the Society in its long history, and 

Presents You This Testimonial 
as a token of the high regard in which you are held by the officers and 
members of the Society. 

Your gracious personality has won friends for you in many walks of 
life, and this quality, with your wide horticultural knowledge, your 
business acumen, and your eminent fairness, have made you an ideal 
executive. Under your leadership the Society has enjoyed a high 
degree of prosperity, serving the community and the state, even as 
was intended by the founding fathers, and making its influence felt 
in many lines of endeavor. 
Given this first day of 
May, 1944, By the Board of Trustees. 

The New George Holliday Prize 

Through the generosity of Mrs. Galen L. Stone and Mr. and Mrs. 
Robert Stone, the George Holliday Memorial Prize was offered for 
the first time at the 1944 Spring Flower Show. Mr. George Holli- 
day, in whose memory the prize was established, was for many 
years in charge of the gardens and greenhouses at "Great Hill," 
the Marion estate of Mrs. Galen L. Stone. The prize can be awarded 
only to an exhibitor of pot plants showing the highest standard 
of culture, and is restricted to private gardeners. The first award 
went to Mr. Stewart Johnson. 

Albert C. Burrage Award 

At a meeting of the Albert C. Burrage Gold Cup Committee 
held in December 1943 as provided in the By-Laws, it was voted 
to recommend the award of the cup to Mr. L. Sherman Adams for 
his exhibit at the Spring Flower Show, which was considered by 
the committee as the most outstanding exhibit at any show con- 
ducted by the Society in the year 1943. Later, this recommenda- 
tion was adopted by the Board and the award made. 

21 







Si. 

Co 






Si 

CO 
§ 

CO 
Oi 



BOOKS ADDED TO THE LIBRARY 



A List of Accessions Made Between 
May 1, 1943, and May 1, 1944 



This list is so arranged as to serve 
as a supplement to the catalogue. 
Members are urged to make use of it. 



Library Accessions 

HORTICULTURE 



General 

Biles, R. E. The American family garden book. 1943. 

Cobb, A. J., ed. Modern garden craft. 1938. 3v. 

Lawn and garden handbook v. 1 no. 1. 1941. 

My Garden, pub. Encyclopedia of garden health (vegetables and fruit). 

1943. 
Rockwell, F. F., comp. 10,000 garden questions answered. 1944. 

History 

Wisconsin state horticultural society. The history of 75 years of service. 
1943. 

AUXILIARY SCIENCES 

Soil science 

Beaumont, A. B. Artificial manures; or, The conservation and use of 

organic matter for soil improvement. 1943. 
Bennett, H. and Pryor, W. C. This land we defend. 1943. 
Faulkner, E. H. Plowman's folly. 1943. 
Van Slyke, L. L. Fertilizers and crop production. 1932. 

Diseases 

Bawden, F. C. Plant viruses and virus diseases; ed. 2. 1943. 

Dodge, B. 0. and Riekett, H. W. Diseases and pests of ornamental 

plants. 1943. 
Hildebrand, E. M. (and others). Handbook of virus diseases of stone 

fruits in North America. 1942. 
McNew, G. L. The use of fungicides during war. 1943. 

Insects 
Gaul, A. T. Picture book of insects. 1943. 
Standen, A. Insect invaders. 1942. 

ORNAMENTAL PLANTS 

General 

Foley, D. J. Garden flowers in color. 1943. 

Wilkinson, A. E. Flower encyclopedia and gardener's guide. 1943. 
Williams, T. A. The old dirt dobber's garden book. 1943. 
. Same ; new and enl. ed. 1944. 

Greenhouse and house plants 

Post, K. Plants and flowers in the home. 1944. 
Wood, A. H., Jr. Plants for the house. 1943. 

24 



BOOKS ADDED TO THE LIBRARY 25 

Bock gardening 

Leschallas, H. P. The small alpine garden, pts 1 & 2. 1937-1939. 

Trees and shrubs 

Billington, C. Shrubs of Michigan. 1943. 

Felt, E. P. Shelter trees in war and peace. 1943. 

Fenska, R. R. Tree experts manual. 1943. 

Special 
American association of botanical gardens and arboretums. Lilacs for 
America. 1942. 

. Same; rev. ed. 1943. 

Lawrence, G. H. M. and Schulze, A. E. The cultivated hederas. 1942. 
Mansfield, T. C. Roses in color and cultivation. 1943. 
Wyman, D. Crab apples for America. 1943. 

ECONOMIC PLANTS 

General 

Clute, W. N. The useful plants of the world; 3d ed. 1943. 

Dodge, E. S. Gourd growers of the south seas. 1943. 

Edgar, W. C. The story of a grain of wheat. 1904. 

Fernald, M. L. and Kinsey, A. C. Edible wild plants of the northeastern 

United States. 1943. 
Fowler, B. Food, a weapon for victory. 1942. 
Hewes, A. D. Spice ho! a story of discovery. 1941. 
Leechman, D. Vegetable dyes. 1943. 
Leighton, C. Give us this day. 1944. 
Lieber, R. America's natural wealth : a story of the use and abuse of 

our resources. 1942. 
Merrill, E. D. Emergency food plants and poisonous plants of the 

islands of the Pacific. 1943. 
Piper, C. V. and Morse, W. J. The soybean. 1943. 
Rather, H. C. Field crops. 1942. 

Sociedad Argentina de Horticultura. Utilidad de las plantas. 1941 ? 
Taylor, H. C. and Taylor, A. D. World trade in agricultural products. 

1943. 

Vegetables 
Coulter, F. C. Manual of home vegetable gardening. 1942. 
Hawkins, L. A. Have a victory garden. 1943. 
Sunset magazine. Sunset's vegetable garden book. 1943. 
Tiedjens, V. A. Vegetable encyclopedia. 1943. 
Tracy, W. W., Jr. American varieties of lettuce. 1904. 

Food processing 
Duncan, A. 0. Food processing. 1942. 
Tressler, D. K. and Evers, C. F. Freezing preservation of foods. 1943. 



26 MASSACHUSETTS HORTICULTURAL SOCIETY 

Fruit 

Bush, C. D. Nut growers handbook. 1941. 

Sukh Dyal, Lala. Tropical fruits. 1942. 

Talbert, T. J. and Murneek, A. E. Fruit crops. 1939. 

Herbs 

Brooklyn Botanic Garden. The herb garden of the Brooklyn Botanic 

Garden. 1943. 
. The medicinal plant garden of the Brooklyn Botanic Garden. 

1943. 
Freeman, M. B. Herbs for the medieval household. 1943. 
Maril, L. Spice and scent. 1943. 
Webster, H. N. Herbs, how to grow them and how to use them; new 

and enl. [4th] ed. 1944. 



BOOKS FOR CHILDREN 

Blough, G. 0. Plants round the year. 1940? 

Eberle, I. Wide fields, the story of Henri Fabre. 1943. 

Gaul, A. T. The picture book of insects. 1943. 

Gould, D. The very first garden. 1943. 

Hewes, A. D. Spice ho ! a story of discovery. 1941. 

Maril, L. Spice and scent. 1943. 

Mason, M. E. Young Audubon, boy naturalist. 1943. 

Parker, B. M. and Cowles, H. C. The book of plants. 1925. 

Parker, B. M. Flowers, fruits, seeds. 1940 ? 

Parker, B. M. The garden and its friends. 1940 ? 

Waugh, D. The warm earth. 1943. 

Webber, I. E. S. Up above and down below. 1943. 



BEES AND BEEKEEPING 

Root, A. I. The ABC and XYZ of bee culture : encyclopedia pertaining 

to scientific and practical culture of bees : new ed. 1940. 
Webb, A. Beekeeping for profit and pleasure. 1943. 



GARDEN DESIGN 

Arthur Hoyt Scott Horticultural Foundation. Swarthmore plant notes : 
trees, shrubs and vines ; Herbaceous plants. 1943. 2v. 

Billington, C. Shrubs of Michigan. 1943. 

Grant, J. and Grant, C. Trees and shrubs for Pacific northwest gardens. 
1943. 

Powell, F. L. In the Chinese garden. 1943. 



BOOKS ADDED TO THE LIBRARY 27 

BOTANY 

General 

Blough, G. 0. Plants round the year. 1940? 

Darrah, W. C. Introduction to the plant sciences. 1942. 

Parker, B. M. and Gowles, H. C. Book of plants. 1925. 

Parker, B. M. Flowers, fruits, seeds. 1940 ? 

Rickett, H. W. The green earth, an invitation to botany. 1943. 

Shimer, H. W. Origin and significance of plant names. 1943. 

Swingle, D. B. Plant life, a textbook of botany ; 2d ed. 1942. 

Waugh, D. The warm earth. 1943. 

Webber, I. E. S. Up above and down below. 1943. 

Physiology 

Cannon, W. A. The topography of the chlorophyll apparatus in desert 

plants : Knox, A. A. The induction, development and heritability of 

fasciations. 1908. 
Holm, T. Contributions to the knowledge of the germination of some 

North American plants. 189].. 
Schopfer, W. H. Plants and vitamins: authorized trans, by N. L. 

Noecker. 1942. 

Monographs 
Baird, V. B. Wild violets of North America. 1942. 
Conard, H. S. The structure and life-history of the hay-scented fern. 

1908. 
Seaver, F. J. Supplement to the North American cup-fungi. 1942. 

Ecology 

Braun-Blanquet, J. Plant sociology : the study of plant communities : 

authorized Eng. trans, of Pflanzensoziologie, trans, by G. D. Fuller 

and H. S. Conard. 1932. 
Clements, F. E. and Shelf ord, V. E. Bio-ecology. 1939. 
Wulff, E. V. An introduction to historical plant geography; trans, by 

Elizabeth Brissenden. 1943. 

Floras 
Abrams, L. Illustrated flora of the Pacific states, vol. 2. 1944. 
Hamilton, G. H. Plants of the Niagara parks system of Ontario. 1943. 
Harlow, W. M. Trees of the eastern United States and Canada, their 

woodcraft and wildlife uses. 1942. 
Kearney, T. II. and Peebles, R. H. Flowering plants and ferns of 

Arizona. 1942. 
Tehon, L. R. Fieldbook of native Illinois shrubs. 1943. 

CONSERVATION 

Fink, 0. E. Conservation for tomorrow's America. 1943. 

Gaer, J. Men and trees: the problem of forest conservation and the 

story of the U. S. Forest service. 1939. 
Van Dersal, W. R. The American land, its history and its uses. 1943. 



28 MASSACHUSETTS HORTICULTUEAL SOCIETY 

COUNTRY LIFE 

Corey, P. Buy an acre : Americans second front. 1944. 

Damon, B. C. A sense of humus. 1943. 

Devoe, G. P. and Ullrich, F. T. Getting acquainted with agriculture. 

1941. 
Duryee, W. B. Farming for security. 1943. 
Waring, P. A. and Teller, W. M. Roots in the earth: the small farmer 

looks ahead. 1943. 
Wilder, W. B. Bounty of the wayside. 1943. 

FORESTRY 

American Tree Association. Forestry directory. 1943. 

Baldwin, H. I. Forest tree seed. 1942. 

Cheney, E. G. American silvics and silviculture. 1942. 

NATURE STUDY 

Agersborg, H. P. K. Nature lore. 1941-1942. 5v. 

Burtscher, W. J. Man afoot. 1941. 

Fuller, R. T. Now that we have to walk : exploring the out-of-doors. 

1943. 
Schmidt, K. P. and Davis, D. D. Field book of snakes. 1941. 

BIRDS 

Hickey, J. J. Guide to bird watching. 1943. 

FLOWER ARRANGEMENT 
Dunlop, H. P. Let's arrange flowers. 1943. 

ESSAYS 

Leighton, C. Give us this day. 1944. 
Wilder, W. B. Bounty of the wayside. 1943. 
Wright, R. Bed book of eating and drinking, 1943. 

BIOGRAPHY 

Barbour, T. Naturalist at large [autobiography]. 1943. 

Beaty, J. Y. Luther Burbank, plant magician. 1943. 

Brown, C. A. Thomas Jefferson and the scientific trends of his time. 

1943. 
Chase, I. W. U. Horace Walpole, gardenist. 1943. 
Eberle, I. Wide fields, the story of Henri Fabre. 1943. 
Edwards, E. E., ed. Jefferson and agriculture. 1943. 
Holt, R. George Washington Carver, an American biography. 1943. 



BOOKS ADDED TO THE LIBRARY 29 

Mason, M. E. Young Audubon, boy naturalist. 1943. 

Olson, J. C. J. Sterling Morton. 1942. 

Williams, H. S. Luther Burbank, his life and work. 1915. 

TRAVEL 

Fairchild, D. Garden islands of the great east : collecting seeds from the 
Philippines and Netherlands East Indies in the junk Cheng-Ho. 1943. 
Peattie, D. C. Journey into America. 1943. 

Gifts to the Library 

The Massachusetts Horticultural Society acknowledges with 
thanks gifts to the Library from the following donors : 

Blackburn, Mrs. J. G. 
Flowers of poetry. 

Downing, A. J. Fruits and fruit trees of America. 1859. 
Coulton, Miss. Our farm of four acres. 
Copeland, R. M. Country life. 
Bernard, Mrs. Bayle. Our common fruits. 
Chorlton, W. American grape grower's guide ; 2d ed. 
Smith, J. Fruits and farinacea the proper food of man. 
Gregg, T. Hand book of fruit culture. 
Karr, A. A tour round my garden. 
Fessenden, T. G. The new American gardener; ed. 17. 

Brooklyn Botanic Garden. 

Guide to the culinary herb garden. 

Burtscher, W. J. 

Burtscher, W. J. Man afoot. 

Buxton, Mrs. H. H. 

Everett, T. H., comp. A partial list of references to the literature on 
begonias. 

CUMMINGS, C. K. 

A deerskin to be used for the repair of special books. 

DiTTMAN_, W. Jay. 

Michigan state horticultural society. Annual reports 66, 68. 
Michigan state department of conservation. Biennial reports 10-11. 

Fink, Ollie E. 

Fink, 0. E. Conservation for tomorrow's America. 

Goehl, Miss M. L. 

Collection of nursery trade catalogues. 

Goodspeed's Book Shop, Boston. 

Vaughan's Seed Store, Chicago. Catalogue for 1888. 



30 massachusetts horticultural society 

Lamb, Mrs. H. 

Beach. Apples of New York, volume 1. 
Hedrick, U. P. Grapes of New York. 

Massachusetts Department of Labor and Industries. 
U. S. Census Bureau. 16th census. Agriculture. 3 vols. 

Merrill, E. D. 

Merrill, E. D. Emergency food plants and poisonous plants of the 
islands of the Pacific. 

Myre, Miss N. Y. 

Taylor, A. D. The complete garden. 

Pyle, R. 

Pyle, R. How to gi'ow roses; 16th ed. rev. 

Thibodeau, John. 

Leschallas, H. P. The small alpine garden, pts 1 & 2. 

Webster, E. S. 

Two deerskins to be used for the repair of special books. 

Weed, Clarence M. 

Michigan state pomological society. 2d annual report. 

Williams, Mrs. F. 

Massey, A. B. Directions for collecting and mailing plants for iden- 
tification, and making a plant collection. 
Massey, A. B. Plant collecting, an enjoyable hobby. 

Wilson, Mrs. A. C. 

Country life, 1941-19-12. 
Gardeners' chronicle, 1942. 
Gardening, v. 63. 

Wisconsin State Horticuittural Society 

The history of 75 years of service (of the Wisconsin state horticul- 
tural society). 



Book Award for 1943 

By vote of the Board of Trustees, Dr. Merritt L. Fernalcl and 
Professor Alfred C. Kinsey have been awarded a Gold Medal 
Certificate for the book "Edible AYild Plants of Eastern North 
America'' as the most notable book of a horticultural nature pub- 
lished in the year 1943. This award was made on recommendation 
of the Library Committee, Mr. Charles K. Cummings, chairman. 



Benevolent Fraternity Fruit and 
Flower Mission 

The Benevolent Fraternity Fruit and Flower Mission has just 
completed its 75th year of continuous service and it is privileged 
once again to express its appreciation to the trustees of the Massa- 
chusetts Horticultural Society for its headquarters room in the 
basement of Horticultural Hall and for the friendly co-operation 
of Mr. Farrington. 

The year has been a critical one. The second world war neces- 
sarily has affected most philanthropic organizations, but there is 
real cause for rejoicing that we have been able to carry on the 
various angles of our work. 

Four hundred and eighty -four hampers and cartons were re- 
ceived at the Centres during the Summer. 

Grafton, Lexington, Scituate, Hanover, Norwell, Wayland, 
Westboro, Wollaston, Groton and Marblehead had a 100 per cent 
record and Cohasset missed only one week. 

Grafton was the banner town, with a total of 70 hampers, 
Lexington held second place and Scituate third. 

The head baggage men at the crowded terminals cheerfully 
solved many problems. 

Two hundred and eighty baskets and gift sprays were dis- 
tributed from headquarters at Thanksgiving, Christmas and 
Easter. Committee members shared their ration points for the 
purchase of canned goods and jelly from money donations. Mrs. 
Arthur P. Teele provided all of the tea bags for the Easter 
baskets. 

From a new friend in Orlando, Florida, we received cacti and 
succulents, very valuable for dish gardens in the hospital wards. 

After the gladiolus show we were able to send the largest quan- 
tity of gorgeous blossoms to individuals and institutions. 

Mrs. Geoffrey G. Whitney kindly contributed Spring Flower 
Show tickets for our special recipients who otherwise could not 
have attended and who cherish the memory through the year. 

The Fruit and Flower Mission is grateful to its many friends. 

Emily I. Elliott, Executive Secretary. 



31 



















o 



MASSACHUSETTS HORTICULTURAL 

SOCIETY 



REPORTS 

OF THE 

OFFICERS AND COMMITTEES 



Presented at the 
ANNUAL MEETING, MAY 1, 1944 







o 
o 

Si. 



The Annual Meeting, 1944 

The annual meeting of the Massachusetts Horticultural Society 
was held in Horticultural Hall, May 1, 1944, with an exception- 
ally large attendance. The president was in the chair and named 
a.s tellers Mrs. Margaret Peters, Mrs. Elizabeth Steffek, Mr. James 
Geehan and Mr. George Graves. The secretary read the call for 
the meeting, after which the president presented his annual 
address, which was followed by the reports of the secretary, the 
treasurer and the chairmen of the various committees. 

Following the reading of the president's address, Mr. Webster 
presented the George Robert White Medal of Honor to Mr. 
Richardson Wright of New York with the following words : 

Presentations 

"Mr. Wright, T aiii proud to present to you the George Robert 
White Medal of Honor. First, however, I want to say this : Apart 
from the intrinsic value of the medal and the high accomplish- 
ments required for its award, there is another fact to be con- 
sidered. In accepting this award, you join a notable company — 
the distinguished men and women of this and other lands who 
have been chosen for this award in past years, and who hold it 
among their most cherished possessions. Our trustees feel that 
you are qualified to enter this distinguished circle, basing their 
decision on the following facts : 

"By 3^our 30 years of service with the great magazine which 
you edit, by your books and your lectures, by your activities in 
many leading organizations, by your research and by your bound- 
less enthusiasm for gardening as an avocation you have, indeed, 
performed eminent service in horticulture, which, as you will 
note, is the one outstanding requirement for this award as stated 
on the medal itself. 

"I hand you the George Robert White Medal of Honor, Mr. 
Wright, with the best wishes of this Society and with my personal 
congratulations." 

Mr. Webster then presented the President's Cup to Mr. 
Alexander I. Heimlich of Woburn. This cup has been awarded 
to Mr. Heimlich for the most meritorious exhibit at the Spring 
Flower Show. In making the presentation, Mr. Webster said: 

"In the dozen years that I have been giving this cup, Mr. 
Heimlich, I have often felt that the committee making the award 

35 



36 MASSACHUSETTS HORTICULTURAL SOCIETY 

had a very difficult task. The word ^meritorious' is bound to have 
a different meaning for different people and I am glad that the 
bestowal of this cup has never been left to me. In your case, 
however, there can be no doubt as to the high degree of imagina- 
tion shown by you in the planning of your jungle garden at the 
1944 Spring show, or as to skill shown by you in the execution 
of your plan. You achievement gave pleasure to thousands of 
Winter-weary people. I hand you the President's Cup with my 
personal congratulations on your success." 

Mrs. S. V. R. Crosby then presented the Bulkley Medal of the 
Garden Club of America to Mr. Will C. Curtis of South Sudbury 
with a few appropriate words, this medal having been awarded 
to Mr. Curtis as having the most educational exhibit at the Spring 
Flower Show. 

In the course of the meeting Mr. Curtis made a few remarks 
critical of certain awards at the Spring show, expressing the 
opinion that some way should be found to bring about more satis- 
factory judging. 

At the close of the exercises, Mr. Wright read a learned and 
comprehensive paper on the Empress Josephine and her gardens, 
especially those devoted to roses, and upon the influence which 
these gardens had on horticulture in European countries. 

The president's address and the various reports made at the 
annuaJ meeting were as follows : 

The President's Address 

It is with real regret that I give you my last report as president 
of the Massachusetts Horticultural Society. No experience in my 
life has given me greater satisfaction than I have found in the 
almost thirteen years that I have held this office. I am exceed- 
ingly grateful for the support which you, as members of the 
Society, have given me throughout this period of time. I am not 
unmindful of the fact that you have permitted me to remain as 
president for a longer time, by almost three years, than any 
other president in the Society's long history. 

I came into office unexpectedly in June of 1931, when my prede- 
cessor, Mr. Albert C. Burrage, suddenly passed away. I had good 
foundations on which to build. Mr. Burrage became president 
when the affairs of the Society were at a low ebb. The total 
membership was less than 900 and the library was virtually in- 
active. He brought about a reorganization which set the Society 
on the path to a greater degree of prosperity than it had known 
for many years. As vice-president, I had something to do with 



ANNUAL MEETING, 1944 37 

formulating the new policies, and as president, I have tried to 
keep them always before me. As a result, the Society has main- 
tained its high position in the horticultural world, and has broad- 
ened its influence so widely that it reaches many other states. 

When I first began to participate actively in the Society's work, 
Professor Charles S. Sargent, Ernest H. Wilson, and Thomas 
Roland were giving the organization much of their time. They 
were three of the ablest men who have had a part in making the 
Society's history. Mr. Wilson and Mr. Roland were especially con- 
cerned with the shows, and it is due largely to their foresight and 
energy that the great Spring exhibitions, as we now know them, 
were developed as a permanent feature of the Society's annual 
program. These exhibitions have had my heartiest support. I am 
certain that they have done much, both from an educational and 
a horticultural standpoint, to enhance the prestige and improve 
the position of the Society. I believe that the methods by which 
these exhibitions are now being handled, with rotating commit- 
tees, is for the best interests of the organization in all respects. 

When the war came, I used my influence to keep the Boston 
show going, even though we had to move it to our own building, 
and in the face of some critical comments. I think no one can 
now question the wisdom of this action. The public flocked to 
both of the shows held here, the attendance of this year's exhibi- 
tion running up to 63,000 — a phenomenal attendance under pres- 
ent conditions. From a standpoint of economics, the show has 
been advantageous to the Society. The surplus realized this 
Spring has largely overcome what looked like a serious deficit. 

The expansion of the library has seemed to me like a logical 
endeavor, and it pleases me to learn that books are now going to 
many different states. The membership, too, has become almost 
national in scope, no less than 34 states being represented on 
our rolls. 

The position which a society occupies in a community must be 
measured by the support which the public gives it. My term of 
office included the recent depression, and to my surprise we actu- 
ally gained in membership through all those difficult years. This 
situation has been altered somewhat with the coming of the war, 
as we have suffered a considerable loss. This downward trend, 
due, I believe, to the war, has now changed upward again. I have 
reason to think this upward trend will continue at a more rapid 
rate when peace comes once more. 

The publication committee has kept our magazine Horticulture 
an active, aggressive agency for the distribution of horticultural 
knowledge. It has developed the paper along unique lines, blazing 



38 MASSACHUSETTS HORTICULTURAL SOCIETY 

a path which is entirely new in the field of horticultural journal- 
ism. I think it is safe to say that no other publication in this field 
is so widely quoted. The co-operation of the Horticultural Society 
of New York, and the Pennsylvania Horticultural Society has 
continued over a long period, and this union of effort on the part 
of the three societies has been one of the many pleasant features 
of my administration. 

If I, as president, have been able to offer the Society anything 
of peculiar value, it is, I think, because I have tried to give all 
of its membership groups equal consideration. As a business man, 
I have appreciated the problems of the commercial growers and 
have tried at all times to keep their interests in mind. I have 
tried to be equally fair to the amateurs among our members, to 
the garden clubs, and to the representatives of the various spe- 
cial societies which have their headquarters or their meeting 
places in this building. I am sure that the necessity of main- 
taining this balance among the various groups represented here 
is of the greatest importance. 

When I lay down this gavel for the last time, it will be with a 
firm conviction that the man who is to take it up is the best choice 
which the Society could have made in its selection of a new presi- 
dent. Mr. John S. Ames is a keen horticulturist and a man whose 
efforts for the Society's progress and welfare have been un- 
flagging over a long term of years. More than that, he has been 
trained for the position by his long service as treasurer and as a 
member of many different committees, including the Prize Com- 
mittee. I know that as president he will be approachable, glad 
to receive the suggestions or the criticism of any member, and 
true to the Society's best traditions. Under the By-laws I shall, 
as an ex-president, remain a member of the Board of Trustees, 
and ]\Ir. Ames knows that I shall be ready at all times to give 
him the benefit of my long experience in this office. I bespeak 
for him the same loyal support and co-operation that has been 
given me. 

My associations with the members of the ever changing Board 
of Trustees have been cordial and sympathetic. I have found 
many warm friends among the men and women serving at differ- 
ent times on the Board. The rule which requires one change in 
the Board each year has seemed a hard one at times, but I still 
believe it to be a sound rule. I have worked harmoniously and 
pleasantly with every committee. Perhaps I have done a real 
service in bringing about more active co-operation between the 
exhibition committee and the prize committee, thus helping to 
obviate differences which sometimes have arisen in the past. There 



ANNUAL MEETING, 1944 39 

never has been a rift in my associations with the personnel at 
Horticultural Hall. Every employee, from Mr. Farrington and 
Mr. Nehrling down, has given me loyal support and the best of 
service ; otherwise I could not have carried on. There has been 
expansion in many directions, particularly in educational pro- 
grams, and an increasing degree of service each year in connec- 
tion with the war work. This will continue, I am sure. 

With all these facts in mind, I repeat that no experience in my 
life has given me greater satisfaction than I have found in my 
work as president of the Massachusetts Horticultural Society. 

Edwin S. Webster, President, 

Report of the Secretary 

Naturally enough, war-time conditions have influenced most of 
the activities at Horticultural Hall the past year. The employ- 
ment situation has been particularly difficult. Mr. Joy has been 
obliged to recruit almost an entirely new crew of assistant jani- 
tors and night watchmen. These men being green, it has not 
been possible to keep Horticultural Hall quite as presentable as 
in normal times. The situation has been further complicated by 
an increased number of rentals, the building being in constant 
use much of the time except in the Summer months. 

Then came the crusade on the part of state officials to make all 
the halls and other places of public assembly safer from possi- 
bilities of the loss of life through fire and panic. This crusade 
reached Horticultural Hall only a few months before the Spring 
flower show, with the result that feverish work was required to 
meet the requirements of the state fire marshal in time to have 
the show on the date scheduled. The last screw was driven into 
place on the morning of the day on which the show opened. 

The changes required included the installation of an auto- 
matic emergency lighting system, the installation of two new 
exits on the ground floor and one out of the library, the re- 
arrangement of all doors so that they would open outward, the 
removal of one set of doors and the use of different locks on 
others. Besides these important changes, the Society was required 
to put double rails on all the stairways and to make certain 
changes in the attic storeroom. All this work was completed 
according to specifications before the opening of the show. 

A new fire escape is to be installed leading from the library' 
floor to the alley, but the state fire marshal did not insist upon 
this work being completed before the show. It must be erected, 
however, some time in the course of the Summer. Final estimates 



40 MASSACHUSETTS HORTICULTURAL SOCIETY 

on this work are not in, as some additional changes on the roof 
probably will be necessary, but the whole expense of the work 
required by the state will run between $5,000 and $7,000. It is 
probable that all of these improvements will, in the long run, be 
to the advantage of the Society and there is no reason for regret- 
ting the fact that they had to be made. 

The membership situation is much brighter than it has been in 
recent years, when losses have been heavy. The downward trend 
was stopped about the middle of the year and we now have a 
slightly larger membership than a year ago at this time. The 
standing at the moment is 6,725. We are hoping and working for 
a material increase in the course of the year. 

One distinct advantage comes from ha\dng the Spring show in 
our own building. It greatly increases the ease with which new 
members can be obtained during the week. Somewhat over 100 
new members were added this year. This show brought thousands 
of persons to the upper floors of the building for the first time. 

The report of the show itself will come from the chairman of 
the exhibition committee. Its returns were sufficiently large to 
substantially reduce what threatened to be a serious deficit for 
the current year. There may be some deficit due to war-time con- 
ditions but it is not likely to be a hea^^^ one. 

The Society has continued its efforts to help with the increased 
production of food and to serve the war effort in other ways. 
The secretary remains a member of the National Garden Com- 
mittee, the State Committee and is acting as county agent for 
Suffolk County. Mr. Nehrling remains secretary of the mayor's 
Victory Garden Committee and is a member of the executive 
committee of the National Victory Institute. Great numbers of 
bulletins have been distributed and canning classes are to be con- 
ducted in this building the coming Summer. A constant flow of 
questions comes to the hall by mail, telephone and personal visit. 
Most of those dealing with horticultural matters are taken care 
of by Mr. Graves, who is also active on the radio. The program 
on which he appears at 6 :15 Monday mornings has become espe- 
cially popular. The Society's Saturday morning program has 
been dropped. 

This Society has worked closely with The Advertising Club of 
Boston in its victory garden work and has participated in several 
events, including a victory garden dinner sponsored by The 
Advertising Club. A conservation meeting held at the Hotel 
Statler by the Society in connection with a dinner for Mr. Louis 
Bromfield was largely attended and proved highly successful. 



ANNUAL MEETING, 1944 41 

This meeting was presided over by Mr. Winthrop L. Carter, at 
that time a trustee, whose death occurred only a few weeks later. 
Mr. Carter's death was a severe blow to our organization. 

The Society has been active in promoting the work of Garden 
Clubs Service, Inc., of which Mrs. Sherman Whipple is chairman. 
At the Spring show over a thousand dollars was raised for the 
hospital fund of this organization and additional money has been 
obtained through the Society's efforts. 

The various organizations having their headquarters in this 
building have continued their work in spite of war-time restric- 
tions, but the Mycological Club of Boston, which has had its offices 
here for more than 25 years, has decided to move to another 
location where facilities for the use of its specimens will be more 
accessible. Our co-operation with this club will not cease, how- 
ever, and we shall continue to call upon it for help in identifying 
specimens, as well as providing opportunities for it to exhibit at 
our shows. 

The Society's magazine Horticulture has been reasonably suc- 
cessful, although working under restrictive measures and being 
called upon to give up many hundreds of its valuable engravings 
to help relieve the copper shortage. The circulation remains about 
35,000, no very serious attempt being made to increase this circu- 
lation at present. 

Mr. Geehan has kept the employment bureau functioning, al- 
though it has been exceedingly difficult to meet the demands for 
competent gardeners. This is a situation similar to that in other 
cities, as the secretary learned when he was called upon to make 
special trips to Philadelphia and Cleveland for conferences with 
horticultural organizations in those cities. 

The awards made by the Society have been announced but 
unfortunately the Society has been unable to deliver the Burrage 
Cup for 1943 or for 1944 because of restrictions on the material 
required for making them. 

In closing, the secretary wishes to express his appreciation of 
the support and assistance given him by the trustees and members 
of the staff and the members of the Society during the past year. 

Edward I. Farrington, Secretary. 



42 MASSACHUSETTS HORTICULTURAL SOCIETY 

Report of the Treasurer 

STATEMENT OF FINANCIAL CONDITION AT 
DECEMBER 31, 1943 

Assets 

Cash in Banks and on Hand $ 22,948.77 

Treasurer : In bank $ 18,536.65 

Bursar : In bank 4,402.12 

On hand 10.00 

$ 22,948.77 

Investments Valued at Cost — schedule A-1 550,003.45 

Chandler Real Estate 2,523.38 

Capital Assets — see note 1 583,738.72 

Real Estate $498,564.63 

Improvements and additions to buildings 38,593.62 

Library 46,580.47 

■ $583,738.72 
Deferred Charges : Spring show, 1944 1,497.13 

$1,160,711.45 

Liabilities and Capital Funds 

Liabilities — Accounts Payable $ 436.58 

Sundry Funds— schedule A-2 460,306.91 

Special uses : Principal $168,694.78 

Unexpended income . 11,568.83 

$180,263.61 

General uses : Principal 280,043.30 

$460,306.91 

Donations — Special 660.02 

Life Membership Fees 24,444.00 

Mount Auburn Cemetery Fund 55,053.52 

Library Cataloguing Fund 751.52 

Capital 564,524.70 

Surplus (Capital) 51,670.93 

Balance, January 1, 1943 $ 47,940.15 

Add : Net Profit on sales of securities 3,730.78 

$ 51,670.93 
Surplus (Earned) at December 31, 1943 2,863.27 

$1,160,711.45 



ANNUAL MEETING, 1944 43 

STATEMENT OF INCOME AND EXPENDITURES 

Income Year Ended Year Ended 

Income from investments and December 31, 1943 December 31, 1942 
bank interest (less proportion 
allocated to restricted funds) $22,779.56 $26,167.78 

Membership fees 17,951.75 17,695.30 

Rentals 4,714.72 3,656.01 

Spring show, 1943 — schedule 

B-1 16,436.01 

Spring show, 1942 — schedule 

B-1 17,376.86 

Incidentals :..... 2,635.43 1,409.16 

Sundry donations 2.00 8.00 

Expenditures -$64,519.47 $66,313.11 

Operating Expenses : 

Building expenses — schedule 

B-3 $20,389.20 $19,644.86 

Library expenses — schedule 

B-4 5,847.00 6,457.41 

Office and general expenses — 

schedule B-5 35,332.92 33,615.87 

Miscellaneous exhibition 

expenses— schedule B-6 . . 5,144.75 5,909.72 

Autumn show, 1943 — 

schedule B-7 417.87 

Autumn show — 1942 

War activities 23.35 

67,131.74 65,651.21 

Awards, Lectures, and Miscellaneous : 

Lectures 278.95 

Medals and certificates 164.38 1,010.51 

Prizes in excess of funds 931.45 

164.38 2,220.91 

Add : Horticulture loss 529.13 3,237.16 

$67,825.25 $71,109.28 
Excess of Expenditures Over 

Income $ 3,305.78 $ 4,796.17 

Balance of Earned Surplus at 

January 1, 1943 ■ 6,484.97 

Deduct : Charges to earned sur- 3,179.19 

plus, as directed by Board 
of Trustees, Jan. 6, 1942: 
Blackout expense 315.92 

Earned Surplus at December 

31, 1943 $ 2,863.27 

John S. Ames, Treasurer, 



44 MASSACHUSETTS HORTICULTURAL SOaETY 

Report of the Library Committee 

About a year ago the library received from Mrs. Fisk Warren, 
one of our members, a collection of prints of orchids. With this 
gift as a nucleus, your committee decided to start a good collec- 
tion of flower and fruit prints for our library, and we were able 
to lay the foundation with a purchase of about 500 items, all of 
fine quality and by good artists. We plan to have in time a well- 
rounded representation af artists, of periods, and of plants of 
garden interest. The collection should have great value both to 
art and to horticulture, and increase the prestige of the library, 
since no other institution, so far as we know, has attempted any- 
thing of the sort. 

It goes without saying that victory gardening is today the 
chief interest among our readers. All the appropriate reading 
matter has been gathered in a convenient place, and has been 
used steadily. 

The library has also started a children's shelf, to which we are 
adding, whenever new gardening and nature books for juniors 
come to our attention. 

In May 1942 we issued a supplementary catalogue, a 32-page 
booklet. In 1943 this was brought up to date by a list in the Year 
Book. Similar annual lists are planned to continue the series until 
we are able to make another complete revision. 

In 1943 the net number of volumes added to the library was 
243. This included magazines, new books and older books bought 
to fill gaps or to meet special interests of readers. 

Three thousand and ten books were borrowed. This was a drop 
of 983 from the preceding year, and continued the downward 
trend of the past five years, but we are glad to say that the begin- 
ning of the year brought a turn for the better. In the first three 
months of 1944, 493 more books were borrowed than in the same 
period a year ago. It is hoped that next May we shall be able to 
make the same report. 

The loan collections of garden club year books have had their 
most successful year. Twenty-six loans have been made or are 
booked for this season, double the number made a year ago. This 
increase is probably due to the printing of an announcement in 
Horticulture, thus for the first time giving real publicity to the 
service. The borrowers include individual clubs, federation groups 
and garden centers in the midwest, the south, and along the 
Atlantic seaboard, and the collections are often made a special 
exhibition feature at important meetings. 

A partial survey made recently shows that the Society has 819 



ANNUAL MEETING, 1944' 45 

members in 38 states in addition to those in Massachusetts. Of 
these members, 85 in 28 states are regular patrons of the library. 
In April, 1940, there were 830 members in 36 states, and 67 of 
them, in 31 states, used the library. 

The library committee voted to recommend to the Board of 
Trustees that the committee be enlarged to five members, three 
of whom must be trustees. This recommendation was accepted by 
the board and is presented to you today for your approval as an 
amendment to the By-Laws. 

C. K. Cum MINGS, Chairman. 



Report of the Committee on Exhibitions 

As chairman of the Committee on Exhibitions I submit the fol- 
lowing brief report covering the operations for the past year : 
Eleven shows were staged by the show manager working in 
co-operation with the exhibitions committee, these being the 
Camellia, Daffodil, Tulip, June, Lily, Gladiolus, Children's, 
Dahlia, and Harvest shows, open to the public without charge, 
and the Spring and Fall shows for which an admission charge 
was made as usual. Profits from the Spring show enables us to 
stage the free shows and the Fall show. 

The total recorded attendance in 1942 was 122,914, and for 
1943, 81,869, no records being made for attendance at the Camellia 
and Children's shows in either year. The drop in total attendance 
was undoubtedly due to transportation restrictions. Attendance 
at the Spring show in 1944 was 6,482 in excess of that in 1943, 
so apparently the tide has turned. 

The exhibitions committee held 11 meetings during the year, 
including one joint meeting with the prize committee. A serious 
attempt has been made to work closely with the prize committee 
on matters in which both groups are interested. As during the 
preceding year, each member of both committees has received 
copies of the minutes of all meetings of both groups. It is stronglj^ 
recommended that this close co-operation of the two committees 
be continued. 

As was the case during the preceding year, various special 
problems developed in reference to staging the larger shows, but 
all of these were solved in a satisfactory manner. On the basis of 
our experience in staging the Spring show in Horticultural Hall 
in 1943, we were able to work out various details of the 1944 show 
in a satisfactory manner, particularly in reference to handling 



46 MASSACHUSETTS HORTICULTURAL SOCIETY 

the crowds at rush hours by laying out the exhibition space to 
better advantage and at the same time eliminating bottlenecks by 
providing wider aisles. It was found that because of transporta- 
tion and other difficulties brought about by war conditions and 
restrictions of one type or another, changes had to be made from 
time to time even almost up to the time of the opening of the 
larger exhibitions. In spite of all difficulties all shows were not 
only successful, but at the same time the exhibitions were note- 
worthy from the standpoint of inaterial shown. The Spring show 
in 1944 was most outstanding in this respect. 

The Spring show developed beyond our expectations, although 
there were many special problems that had to be solved. While 
at times it seemed that we might have difficulties in filling the 
available exhibition space, actuallj^ as the season advanced, more 
applications for space were received than we could take care of 
both for exhibition and for trade space ; in reference to the latter 
we could have disposed of twice as mucli space as was available. 

In spite of the fact that beginning in 1943 all other large flower 
shows in the United States were discontinued, the decision of the 
trustees of the Massachusetts Horticultural Society to stage its 
annual Spring show has been amply justified. In 1943 our total 
attendance was 56,792 at the March show, but in 1944 it was 
63,274, an increase of 6,482. At the same time the profits to the 
Society increased from $16,249.31 in 1943, to approximately 
$25,000.00 in 1944. This difference in profit is due in part to the 
increased attendance, and in part to a reduction in the operating 
budget. 

May I express to all members of the exhibition and prize com- 
mittees, as well as to the officials of the Society, my personal 
appreciation of their individual and collective efforts in making 
the year the successful one it proved to be. At the same time I 
wish to commend to the Society the untiring, efficient, and un- 
selfish efforts of the show manager, Mr. Arno H. Nehrling. For 
the benefit of the Society, I wish to place on record the fact that 
since he accepted appointment in 1934 and took over the responsi- 
bility of handling all details regarding the numerous exhibitions, 
the total profits of the 11 large Spring shows that he has staged 
have aggregated $237,427.41. A part of this has been set up as a 
flower show reserve to take care of unforeseen contingencies in 
case we should have an unprofitable Spring show, due to weather 
or other causes ; some has been used to finance the free shows and 
the Fall show, but much of it has been utilized by the Society to 
maintain and increase its services to members of the Society and 



ANNUAL MEETING, 1944 47 

to the horticultural public. The total attendance at these 11 shows 
was 954,011. Thus the show manager, the exhibition committee, 
individuals, groups, and firms that participate in the several 
shows work in unity for the prestige and financial benefit of the 
Massachusetts Horticultural Society. May this co-operation long 
continue and become increasingly efficient. The ideal would be a 
larger endowment, for this would enable us to stage larger and 
better shows, releasing a larger part of the show profits for show 
purposes. 

E. D. Merrill, Chairman. 



Report of the Committee on Prizes 

Your committee on prizes selected the judges for ten shows the 
past year and considered their recommendations. At several of 
the smaller shows we have done all the judging rather than ask 
judges to come from a distance, with transportation and man- 
power shortages such as they are. We have emphasized to the 
judges that all exhibits should be scaled. 

The culture and quality of the majority of the exhibits through- 
out the year has been excellent. This was especially true of the 
Spring show. 

We have been kept informed of the actions of the committee on 
exhibitions and at the time of the Spring show had a joint meeting 
with them. 

The committee on prizes views and appraises each and every 
exhibit during the year which would be eligible for the Burrage 
Cup award. Because of this fact, your committee feels that the 
committee on prizes as a whole should have more to say in the 
awarding of this cup. We present two alternatives for your con- 
sideration. 

1. Abolish the special committee on the Burrage Cup award 
and transfer to the committee on prizes that function. Or, 

2. Keep the special committee, but when they meet for con- 
sideration of the recommendation to be made to the trustees for 
the award of the Burrage Cup, have the members of the commit- 
tee on prizes meet with them as a joint committee. 

We suggest that the list of judges on file in Mr. Nehrling's 
office be revised and brought up to date. If possible, new names 
should be added. 



48 MASSACHUSETTS HORTICULTURAL SOCIETY 

During the past year the following certificates were awarded 
by your committee : 

Gold Medal Certificates 22 

Silver Medal Certificates 23 

Bronze Medal Certificates 10 

First Class Certificates 18 

Awards of Merit 48 

Votes of Commendation 9 

Cultural Certificates 28 

Vote of Thanks 20 

Total awards for year 178 

Aubrey B. Butler, Chairman. 

Report of the Committee on the Exhibition of the 
Products of Children's Gardens 

The fact that our national and state governments urged every 
citizen to grow as much food as possible was reflected in a greater 
number of children's gardens the past season. Last Summer at 
least 25 per cent more school and home gardens were cultivated 
by the children under the supervision of qualified garden teach- 
ers. The school department of the City of Boston deserves credit 
for encouraging the children to plant vegetables. Later in the 
season instructors taught the children through canning classes 
how to prepare the surplus from their gardens for winter use. 
The park department also deserves a word of commendation as 
Commis-sioner Long, who is also the director of the Boston Victory 
Garden Committee, made it possible for children who did not 
have land available at home to have a garden in one of the tracts 
set aside for Victory gardens. 

This added interest in gardening was reflected in the largest 
exhibition of the products of children's gardens ever staged in 
Horticultural Hall. There were 1,636 individual entries, an in- 
crease of 338 over the 1942 exhibition. In addition, there were 
over 700 entries in the 4-H Club section, making a total of 2,336 
entries in the entire show. Considering the dry season, the quality 
of the vegetables and flowers was excellent. The children brought 
in very few large specimens, no doubt due to the fact that they 
were told that a medium-sized, uniform vegetable is much more 
satisfactory for show purposes than one abnormally large. 

The green tomato class had 226 entries, thus topping the list. 
Second was the class for ripe tomatoes with 210 entries. There 



ANNUAL MEETING, 1944 49 

were 150 entries in the class calling for any other variety of 
vegetable. Ninety entries in the class for green beans. Nearly 
every class had more than 25 entries. The flower classes, totaling 
205 entries, helped to make the show more interesting and 
colorful. 

The greatest number of prizes went again to the children of 
Boston, but the children from Brockton and Cambridge also made 
an excellent showing. As a matter of fact, the competition was 
keen in every class. 

Even though the weather was hot and sultry, the attendance 
was much larger than in former years. Many Victory gardeners 
came to see the show so as to obtain ideas for exhibits they were 
planning to stage at the Victory harvest show. The committee 
was pleased to see so many adults in attendance. 

In closing this report, I want to again express my thanks to 
Mr. Daniel O'Brien, assistant director in charge of gardening and 
vocational agriculture in the Boston schools, and Mr. Henry G. 
Wendler, assistant director of the Boston Victory Garden Com- 
mittee, for their untiring efforts and careful planning of the 
children's gardens and for their assistance in staging the show so 
efficiently. I would also like to thank Mrs. Tudor for her interest 
and the many valuable suggestions she presented in preparing 
the schedule. Mr. Earle Nodine in charge of the 4-H section of 
the show also deserves much credit for the splendid exhibits that 
are staged under his direction at this exhibition. 

S. J. GoDDARD, Chairman. 



Result of the Balloting 

At 4 :30 o'clock the polls were closed, 90 votes having been cast, 
and the following persons were declared elected : 
President: John S. Ames 
Vice-President : Dr. George 0. Clark 
Trustees: Paul W. Dempsey 

Samuel J. Goddard 

Ernest Hoptyzer 

Q. A. Shaw McKean 

Dr. Elmer D. Merrill 

Harold S. Ross 

The following amendment was adopted : 

Amend Section 2 of the By-Laws by substituting the words 
"five members, at least three of whom shall be trustees" for the 



50 



MASSACHUSETTS HORTICULTURAL SOCIETY 



words "three trustees," so that the paragraph shall read, "The 
Committee on Libraries, consisting of five members, at least three 
of whom shall be trustees, shall have charge of the care, mainte- 
nance, extension and use of the Society's library or libraries." 




Terrace garden, part of the exhibit of the Massachusetts 
Federation of Garden Clubs at the Spring shoio, 1944. 



Board of Trustees 

At the first meeting of the newly organized Board of Trustees 
held May 1, 1944, following the annual meeting of the Society, 
the new president, Mr. John S. Ames, took the chair and after 
being given authority to make the committee appointments for 
the year, announced these appointments as they appear on a 
previous page. 

Mr. Ames having resigned as treasurer to become president, 
Mr. Walter Hunnewell was elected treasurer in his place. The 
election of Mr. Hunnewell as treasurer left a vacancy in the 
elected Board of Trustees, inasmuch as the treasurer is an ex- 
officio member of the Board. Mr. George Lewis, Jr., was then 
elected a Trustee to fill this vacanc}^ 

Mr. Edward I. Farrington was elected secretary for another 
year. 

At this meeting Mr. Webster presented the following resolu- 
tions on the death of the late Winthrop L. Carter, long a member 
of the board : 



ANNUAL MEETING, 1944 51 

''WHEREAS, death has taken Winthrop L. Carter, long a 
valued member of this Board ; and 

"WHEREAS, Mr. Carter was for twelve years an active mem- 
ber of this Society ; be it, therefore : 

''RESOLVED, That in the death of Mr. Carter, this Board 
has suffered a heavy loss, while its members have been deprived 
of the association of a man whose friendly counsel, wise advice 
and optimistic attitude added much to the discussions and deci- 
sions of this bod3^ Be it also 

"RESOLVED, That this Board, acting for the Society as a 
whole, expresses its deep regret at the passing of Mr. Carter, who 
could be depended upon to meet any emergency and who only a 
few weeks before his death presided at an important conservation 
meeting held by this Society at the Hotel Statler. Be it also 

"RESOLVED, That as a perpetual memorial these resolutions 
be spread on the records of this Society and that a copy thereof 
be sent to Mr. Carter's family." 

(Signed) Edv^in S. Webster. 

These resolutions were adopted and ordered spread on the 
records of the Society. The members of the Board paid tribute 
to their late member by standing. 

At this meeting, Henry M. Williams of Plaistow, N. H., Harry 
A. Wheeler of Lexington, Mass., and Edward L Farrington of 
East Weymouth, were made life members, each having paid 
annual dues for a period of 25 years. 



Necrology 



Following is a list of the members of the Massachusetts Horti- 
cultural Society whose deaths were reported to May 1, 1944. 



Mrs. Frank T. Albro 
Mrs. George E. Bates 
Miss Helen E. Bingham 
Mr. Charles M. Boyd 
Mr. Charles H. Breck 
Mrs. Luther W. Bridges 
Mrs. George R. Briggs 
Miss Kate Buss 
Miss Lydia A. Buxton 
Mr. Winthrop L. Carter 
Mrs. Mary F. Colbum 
Mr. L. M." Colwell 
Mr. Charles Copeland 
Miss Fanny E. Corne 
Mrs. Thomas D. Covel 
Mr. Jerome W. Cross 
Mrs. William R. Dewey 
Mrs. William B. H. Dowse 
Miss Nancy T. Draper 
Miss Bertha M. Druley 
Miss Martha W. Edgerly 
Mr. Clarence J. Edwards 
Mrs. WiUiam T. Farley 
Miss Alice B. Felt 
Mr. Gordon Fisher 
Mr. Peter Fisher 
Mr. Albert F. Gilmorc 
Dr. Amos I. Hadley 
Mr. Albert W. Hall 
Miss Fannie S. Hall 
Miss Lenda T. Hanks 
Mrs. Wilmot R. Hastings 
Mr. R. Marion Hatton 
Mr. Richard J. Hayden 
Mr. William R. Hedge 
Mr. Woodman C. Hill 
Mrs. Sumner Hollingsworth 
Mr. Frederic C. Hood 
Mrs. Frederick J. Hoxie 
Mrs. Lizzie E. Hurd 
Mrs. Maynard Hutchinson 
Mr. Alfred R. Hutson 
Mrs. Clarence R. Hyde 
Mr. William J. Jensen 



Mrs. Theodore E. Jewell 
Mr. John F. Johnson 
Miss Katherine P. Loring 
Dr. Abbott Lawrence Lowell 
Mr. Charles T. Main 
Mrs. Daniel Edgar Manson 
Mr. James A. McDonough 
Mrs. Thomas W. Norman 
Mrs. Samuel Norwich 
Mr. Robert Treat Paine, 2nd 
Miss Alice A. Richards 
Mr. Alfred R. Robinson 
Mr. Edward Rose 
Mrs. M. Denman Ross 
Mr. Benjamin F. W. Russell 
Mr. James Salter 
Mrs. M. Ida Sanborn 
Mrs. Frank D. Sawyer 
Miss Helen M. Seymour 
Mrs. Josia B. Shurtleff, Jr. 
Mrs. Herbert L. Slade 
Mr. Phineas W. Sprague 
Mr. John E. Stacey 
Mrs. Harry C. Starbird 
Miss Lucy B. Story 
Mr. Edward P. Sumner 
Miss Lucy W. Swift 
Mrs. P. K. Taylor 
Mrs. Philip M. Tucl^er 
Mr. John Van de Gram pel 
Miss Mary L. Vinal 
Mrs. Julia P. Wakefield 
Mr. Hollis Webster 
Mrs. Henry C. Weeks 
Miss N. M. Weeks 
Miss Elsie M. West 
Prof. Edward Albert White 
Mrs. George R. Whitten 
Mrs. Edwin M. Wilder 
Mr. Edward A. Wilkie 
Mr. S. Herbert Wilkins 
Mr. Boylston L. Williams 
Miss Laura S. Wing 
Miss Jane Woodward 



52 



Massachusetts Horticultural Society 

HONORARY MEMBERS 

1942 Lord Aberconway, North Wales, England 

1942 F. A. Bartlett, Stamford, Connecticut 

1942 Walter D. Brownell, Little Compton, Rhode Island 

1942 Alex Gumming, Bristol, Connecticut 

1942 Dr. William A. Dayton, Washington, District of Columbia 

1942 A. T. De La Mare, New York, New York — 

1942 David Fairchild, Coconut Grove, Florida 

1942 Joseph B. Gable, Stewartstown, Pennsylvania 

1942 Arthur Herrington, New York, New York 

1942 Henry Hicks, Westbury, Long Island, New York 

1942 Fred H. Howard, Montebello, California 

1942 August Koch, Chicago, Illinois 

1942 Colonel R. H. Montgomery, Coconut Grove, Florida 

1942 Robert Moses, New York, New York 

1942 G. G. Nearing, Ridgewood, New Jersey 

1942 Frederick Law Olmsted, Brookline, Massachusetts 

1942 George H. Pring, St. Louis, Missouri 

1942 Dr. Alfred Reitder, Jamaica Plain, Massachusetts 

1942 Dr. a. B. Stout, New York, New York 

1942 Norman Taylor, New York, New York 

1942 Dr. William A. Taylor, Washington, District of Columbia 

1942 C. J. Van Bourgondien, Babylon, Long Island, New York 

1942 Richard Wellington, Geneva, New York 

1942 Elizabeth C. White, Whitesbog, New Jersey 

1943 Albert C. Burrage, Jr., Boston, Massachusetts 

1943 Vincent R. DePetris, Grosse Pointe Farms, Michigan 

1943 Jens Jensen, Ellison Bay, Wisconsin 

1943 Henry T. Skinner, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 

1944 Edward 0. Orpet, Santa Barl)ara, California 
1944 Wilfrid Wheeler, Falmouth, Massachusetts 
1944 Richardson Wright, New York, New York 

CORRESPONDING MEMBERS 

1925 Rudolph D. Anstead, Bournemouth, England 

1889 Dr. L. H. Bailey, Ithaca, New York 

1925 F. R. S. Balfour, F.L.S., Dawyck, Stobo, Tweeddale, Scotland 

1911 W. J. Bean, 2, Mortlake Road, Kew, England 

1918 Desire Bois, Paris, France 

1925 I. H. BuRKiLL, F.L.S., "Clova," Fetcham Park, Leatherhead, 

Survey, England 

1921 Fred J. Chittenden, Royal Horticultural Society, Vincent Square, 

Westminster, London, England 

53 



54 MASSACHUSETTS HORTICULTURAL SOCIETY 

1925 WooN Young Chun, Sun Yat Sen University, Canton, China 
1925 G. W. Darnell- Smith, Director of the Sydney Botanic Gardens, 

Sydney, New South Wales 
1925 Henry F. duPont, Winterthur, Delaware 
1925 Pierre S. duPont, Wilmington, Delaware 
1925 Charles C. Eley, M.A., F.L.S., Suffolk, England 
1925 G. Eraser, Ucuelet, Vancouver Island, British Columbia 
1925 W. G. Freei^ian, B.S.C, F.L.S., Imperial Institute, South 

Kensington, London S.W.7, England 
1918 Professor N. E. Hansen, Brookings, South Dakota 
1911 Professor U. P. Hedrick, Geneva, New York 
1925 Professor H. H. Hu, Fan Memorial Institute of Biology, Peking, 

China 
1925 Mrs. C. L. Hutchinson, Lake Geneva, Wisconsin 
1925 Charles W. Knight, Oakdale, New York 
1921 C. E. Lane-Poole, CanbeiTa, Australia 
1925 C. C. Laney, Rochester, N. Y. 
1911 M. Emile Lemoine, Nancy, France 
1925 Sir J. S. Maxwell, Bart, K.T., Pollok House, near Glasgow, 

Scotland 
1918 J. Horace McFarland, Harrisburg, Pennsylvania 
1925 Mrs. William Mercer, Doylestown, Pennsylvania 
1925 Dr. Kingo Miyabe, Imperial University, Sapparo, Japan 
1898 Sir Frederick W. Moore, F.L.S., Willbrook House, Rathfarnham 

Co., Dublin, Ireland 
1918 Dr. George T. Moore, Botanical Gardens, St. Louis, Missouri 
1925 F. Cleveland Morgan, Montreal, Canada 
1925 M. L. Parde, Nogent-sur-Vernisson (Loiret), France 
1925 I. B. PoLE-EvANS, C.M.G., Chief of Division and Director, Botani- 
cal Survey, Pretoria, Transvaal, South Africa 
1925 Miss Isabella Preston, Ottawa, Canada 
1925 Johannes Rafn, Skovfrokontoret, Copenhagen, Denmark 
1906 Dr. Henry N. Ridley, C.M.G., F.R.S., F.L.S., M.A., Kew, Surrey, 

England 
1925 Camillo Schneider, c/o Gartenschonheit, Berlin-Westend, 

Germany 
1925 F. L. Skinner, Dropmore, Manitoba 
1925 Sir William Wright Smith, F.L.S., Royal Botanic Garden, 

Edinburgh, Scotland 
1893 Professor Willia:m Trelease, Urbana, Illinois 
1918 F. Gomer Waterer, Knaphill, Surrey, England 
1925 Cyril T. White, Government Botanist, Brisbane, Queensland, 

Australia 
1921 GuRNEY Wilson, Secretary Royal Hoi-ticultural Society Orchid 

Committee, Vincent Square, London S.W.I, England 
1925 John C. Wister, Germantown, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 
1925 Major A. C. T. Woodv^ard, Bewdley, Worcestershire, England 



Bequests to the Massachusetts 
Horticultural Society 

It is hoped by the Massachusetts Horticultural Society that it 
will not be forgotten by members who find it expedient to make 
their wills. This Society's financial condition is sound and its 
investments are good, but the income from many of its invest- 
ments has declined because of decreased returns from its bond 
holdings. Expenses naturally have increased and more money is 
needed to extend the activities of the Society. 

The following form of bequest is suggested : 

FORM OF BEQUEST 



I give and bequeath to the Massachusetts Horticultural Society 

located in Boston, Massachusetts, the sum of 

to be used as the Board of Trustees may 

direct for the promotion of horticulture in its various forms and 
for extending the activities of the Society along educational lines. 

Signed .. 



''/. 



t y